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Hoochie Coochie Man

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Hoochie Coochie Man album cover
01
Country Boy
4:12
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02
Baby Please Don't Go
2:38
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03
Hoochie Coochie Man
3:16
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04
Sittin' And Thinkin'
4:34
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05
19 Years Old
4:54
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06
County Jail
6:06
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07
Long Distance Call
6:55
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08
Rock Me Baby
4:58
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09
Sweet Little Angel
2:44
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10
Rosalie
5:20
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11
All Night Long
4:19
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12
Early Morning Blues
4:45
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Album Information
LIVE

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 54:41

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Two different concerts

danielkoelzer

Actually the tracks are from two different shows. Tracks 1-5 were recorded in Europe in May 1964 and the band consisted of Otis Spann (p), Ransom Knowling (b), Willie Smith (d). The correct title of SITTIN' AND THINKIN' is TIGER IN YOUR TANK. Tracks 6-12 were recorded at the Montreux Jazz Festival, Switzerland on June 17, 1972. This time Muddy is accompanied by George Buford (hca), Lafayette Leake (p), Louis Myers (g), Dave Myers (b), Fred Below (d). The correct title of SWEET LITTLE ANGEL is TROUBLE NO MORE, ALL NIGHT LONG is ROLLIN' AND TUMBLIN' and EARLY MORNING BLUES is FEEL LIKE GOING HOME. More titles from the same concert were originally issued by Chess on their BLUES AVALANCHE album.

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Muddy is King

RayC

I had to hunt around for the right Muddy album to review. Muddy Waters invented electric blues and then refined it with sidemen like these. Thank God emusic has albums like this available.

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One more correction

mr. mark

I doubt that George "Harmonica" Smith played sax on this show--maybe the Mississippi Saxophone (which is what Little Walter called the blues harp/harmonica!) for blues info, try blueswax.com (free online magazine)or Bluesrevue.com (subscription hard copy bimonthly magazine. Also Livingblues.org (a much older hard copy magazine which has been published since the 70's.) I prefer Blues Revue, which includes too much rock for some people's taste but eschews some of Living Blues' political and racial agendas.

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actual song titles for HCM album

mr. mark

This is a teriffic show, from a band Chess never recorded live (or really, not much at all). However, the record company got almost all of the song titles wrong. 1. Country Boy 2. Baby Please Don't Go 3. Hoochie Coochie Man 4. Nineteen Years Old 5. County Jail 6. Long Distance Call 7. Rock Me (Rock Me Baby is a BB King song) 8, Trouble No More 9. Rosalie 10.Rollin' And Tumblin' 11.Tiger In Your Tank (this is apparently the correct position of the song. don't waste one of your monthly downloads on the other one, they are both the same.)Great bottleneck slide by Muddy on "Tiger". This song is inspired by a gasoline ad of the day, and was covered on stage by the Stones. As I said, a great show, very well recorded. You need all the Muddy concerts on e-music-any Muddy show is a great Muddy show. I also recommend The Unissued 1963 Blues Festival (various artists, mostly Sonny Boy Williamson II and Memphis Slim).

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A Rare Gem

Muddy

This recording is a gem. Featuring some of Muddy's best sidemen: Francis Clay, Otis Spann, and an absolutely splendid and mostly unknown guitar player named Sammy Lawhorn. Sammy was a musician's musician. Lawhorn is little known by the general public, but well known among blues players. He did play on a number of Junior Wells early recordings. There are some serious errors here: Track # 11 is mislabeled. It's actually "Rollin' and Tumblin'" Track #4 and #12 Are the same track and both mislabeled. They should be "Tiger in your Tank" This live recording is rare and worthwhile.

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They Say All Music Guide

The source for this 1964 live performance appears to be Lippmann and Rau, the sponsors of Europe’s American Folk Blues Festival. Considering that Chess Records never recorded Muddy’s live set during this era, this disc is priceless. Otis Spann is at the piano, George Smith plays sax, Sammy Lawhorn is the second guitarist, and Francis Clay and Luther Johnson are the rhythm section. The dozen songs include “Country Boy,” “Baby Please Don’t Go,” “Sweet Little Angel,” and “Rock Me Baby.” The show is loose and lively, the band incredibly tight (especially Johnson and Clay on bass and drums), including a delightfully sly, teasing performance on “Hoochie Coochie Man,” a rip-roaring “Sittin’ and Thinkin’,” and surging, volcanic renditions of “Long Distance Call,” “She’s Nineteen Years Old” and “County Jail.” The sound is generally excellent as well, making this an indispensable part of any serious blues collection, and doubly so for Muddy’s fans. – Bruce Eder

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