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Mudhoney

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Mudhoney album cover
01
This Gift
3:36
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02
Flat out Fucked
2:18
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03
Get Into Yours
3:52
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04
You Got It
2:52
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05
Magnolia Caboose Babyshit
1:09
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06
Come to Mind
4:54
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07
Here Comes Sickness
3:43
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08
Running Loaded
2:52
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09
The Farther I Go
2:09
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10
By Her Own Hand
3:18
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11
When Tomorrow Hits
2:42
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12
Dead Love
4:27
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 37:52

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Kevin O'Donnell

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Kevin O'Donnell has worked as an editor at Rolling Stone and SPIN and his writing on music, books and pop culture has been published in the Washington Post, NPR...more »

09.21.11
Mudhoney, Mudhoney
Label: Sub Pop Records

If there was any band poised to break on a level equal to Nirvana and Pearl Jam, it was Mark Arm’s post-Green River group, whose 1988 anthem “Touch Me I’m Sick” remains grunge’s National Anthem. Unfortunately, the band never took off, but their debut album is one of the genre’s most overlooked records — and sounds amazingly polished for a Jack Endino-produced record. Highlights include the album opener “This Gift” and the blues-tinged anthem “Flat… read more »

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shoutingbrown

Was lucky enough to catch Mudhoney live three times around 1989/1990. Live, as on LP, they were a glorious fuzzy dirty mess that still somehow managed to sound tight at the same time. Forget all the grunge wannabes of the early 90s, this was the real thing.

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Better than Ned sez

permafrost154

This record is like when you realize that the band your little brother and his skateboard-stoner friends formed is actually pretty fucking good. Incredibly influential release. This rocks way harder than you do.

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They Say All Music Guide

Mudhoney’s first self-titled album came as a bit of a disappointment after the group’s initial singles, and from the distance of over a decade it’s even more of a sore thumb in the band’s extensive discography. It’s good, to be sure, but not great; the essential spark of the band got a bit lost over 40 minutes, where in three minutes’ space the quartet could be the best act on the planet. Then again, arguably Mudhoney was trying to figure out how to make a full album work with their sound, and if it’s not a perfect listen as a whole, there are still some great songs to hear. Jack Endino’s production lives up to his reputation for rough, thick recording, but he’s left just enough for the songs to breathe, whether it’s the audible handclaps on “This Gift” or the quirky guitar riff leading into Dan Peters’ rollicking drum rolls on “You Got It.” “When Tomorrow Hits” is easily the sleeper hit of the record; later memorably covered by Sonic Boom in the dying days of Spacemen 3, its slow, dreamily threatening build shows off the band’s ability for subtlety amidst the volume. “Flat out Fucked” about sums up the whole ethos of the album — careening pace, compressed feedback roar, and Mark Arm’s desperate but never self-important singing resulting in neo-garage rock anti-anthems. About as good is the brilliantly titled instrumental “Magnolia Caboose Babyshit,” which gives Steve Turner and Arm a chance to show off some crazy acid rock/proto-funk guitar that avoids sucking, always a pleasure. A couple of draggy numbers and others that take a good idea but almost run too much with it (“Come to Mind,” well, comes to mind) keep things from fully working, but next time out Mudhoney would have the perfect combination down. – Ned Raggett

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