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Nancy In London

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (19 ratings)
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Nancy In London album cover
01
On Broadway
2:47
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02
The End
2:25
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03
Step Aside
2:35
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04
I Can't Grow Peaches On A Cherry Tree
2:41
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05
Summer Wine
3:43
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06
Wishin' And Hopin'
2:52
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07
This Little Bird
2:10
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08
Shades
2:18
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09
The More I See You
2:31
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10
Hutchinson Jail
2:51
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11
Friday's Child
3:03
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100 Years
2:31
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13
You Only Live Twice
2:58
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Tony Rome
2:26
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15
Life's A Trippy Thing
2:41
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 15   Total Length: 40:32

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I have to agree with Doctor Dee (below)...

latymer14

I like this album and listen to this all the time...music is so subjective. Sometimes I wonder if most music critics actually like music.

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Sinatra yes, Unterberger no.

DoctorDee69

AMG's Richie Unterberger claims that this album features "humdrum covers of contemporary pop and rock hits and pop standards", revealing two things. Firstly that he misses the point completely. Secondly, his verbosity reveals he was trying to hit a minimum word count in a review of an album about which he really had nothing to say. Ignore his review, you can be sure Sinatra Jr. will be remembered long after Unterberger is forgotten. This is vintage Nancy Sinatra: country influenced pop-rock, with Lee in tow to keep her on the right lines. It differs little from her other work in style or quality, and if you like her other stuff, you'll love this.

eMusic Features

1

Six Degrees of Lana Del Rey’s Born to Die

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

1

Six Degrees of Lana Del Rey’s Born to Die

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

The change of locale for Nancy Sinatra’s third album didn’t change her approach much: it’s dominated by humdrum covers of contemporary pop and rock hits and pop standards, with some second-rank Lee Hazlewood country songs thrown in, though his compositions “Friday Child” and “Summer Wine” (the second of which is a Sinatra/Hazlewood duet) are strong, moody highlights. The four bonus tracks, taken from singles, outclass the original LP: “100 Years,” “You Only Live Twice” (the single version), “Tony Rome,” and her cringingly dated duet with her father, “Life’s a Trippy Thing.” – Richie Unterberger