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Ghosts I-IV

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Ghosts I-IV album cover
01
01 Ghosts I
2:49
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02 Ghosts I
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03 Ghosts I
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04 Ghosts I
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05 Ghosts I
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06 Ghosts I
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07 Ghosts I
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08 Ghosts I
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09 Ghosts I
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10 Ghosts II
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11 Ghosts II
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12 Ghosts II
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13 Ghosts II
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14 Ghosts II
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15 Ghosts II
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16 Ghosts II
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17 Ghosts II
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18 Ghosts II
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19 Ghosts III
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20 Ghosts III
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21 Ghosts III
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22 Ghosts III
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23 Ghosts III
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24 Ghosts III
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25 Ghosts III
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26 Ghosts III
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27 Ghosts III
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28 Ghosts IV
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29 Ghosts IV
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30 Ghosts IV
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31 Ghosts IV
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32 Ghosts IV
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33 Ghosts IV
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34 Ghosts IV
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35 Ghosts IV
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36 Ghosts IV
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 36   Total Length: 110:27

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Just awesome

velocipede

If you are lost without lyrics, this might not be for you, but if you appreciate the depth and creativity of Reznor's sonic explorations, you should like this. Like a more muscular predecessor to his soundtrack work in later years, this really shows the range of his talent, which includes choosing great collaborators.

eMusic Features

2

Icon: Trent Reznor

By Andrew Parks, Contributor

It's hard to fathom how Trent Reznor went from being a wiry, mud-caked madman (what up, Woodstock '94?) to a ripped Oscar winner, but one thing's clear at this point in his career: While his contemporaries are busy shilling Absinthe (sorry, Mansinthe) and struggling to remain relevant in a restless alt-rock landscape, Nine Inch Nails' string-yanking singer/songwriter is in it for the long haul. Part of it has to do with the agonizing level of perfectionism… more »

2

Icon: Trent Reznor

By Andrew Parks, Contributor

It's hard to fathom how Trent Reznor went from being a wiry, mud-caked madman (what up, Woodstock '94?) to a ripped Oscar winner, but one thing's clear at this point in his career: While his contemporaries are busy shilling Absinthe (sorry, Mansinthe) and struggling to remain relevant in a restless alt-rock landscape, Nine Inch Nails' string-yanking singer/songwriter is in it for the long haul. Part of it has to do with the agonizing level of perfectionism… more »

4

Comeback Kids: The 10 Best Musical Resurrections

By Arye Dworken, Contributor

Remember that band you loved that broke up? Well, next year, they're playing Coachella. We live in an age when band reunions are bordering on passé, which can obscure the fact that a well-executed comeback is often difficult to come by. Take Limp Bizkit. That once incredibly popular band released an album this year that you probably had had no idea existed. Or on a somewhat more credible note, Duran Duran reunited and recruited famed… more »

0

Six Degrees of Nine Inch Nails’ The Downward Spiral

By Aaron Burgess, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Nine Inch Nails’ The Downward Spiral

By Aaron Burgess, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Roughly a year after Year Zero — a year marked by lots of sniping with his record company first about their clueless promotion then devolving into a tirade about their general uselessness — Trent Reznor broke free of Interscope/Universal and became a free agent, releasing music where and when he wanted. To celebrate his freedom he released the four-part Ghosts, a clearinghouse of 36 instrumentals all created during the years he crafted Year Zero. It should come as no great surprise that Ghosts then plays like a sketchbook, a place where Reznor jotted down sounds and textures that flitted across his mind and then either took them no further, or decided to spin them into something entirely new for the full album. These aren’t songs, they’re seeds, and they (appropriately) aren’t even graced with titles; they’re all dubbed “Ghosts,” parts one through 36, and if Reznor didn’t spend enough time crafting them into proper songs, don’t feel too bad if you don’t spend enough time with Ghosts to sort through them, picking out which fragments are powered by a clenched electro beat and which are glassy ambient shards. Even fanatics might be hard-pressed to give Ghosts such a careful listen as it’s simply not meant to be so closely observed. It’s meant to be taken as surface, perhaps skimmed for samples, but generally to be used as mildly unsettling mood music — a specialty of Reznor’s, to be sure, but he’s better and scarier when his ideas are more finely honed than they are here. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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