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The Slip

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (594 ratings)
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The Slip album cover
01
999,999
1:25
$0.49
$0.99
02
1,000,000
3:56
$0.49
$0.99
03
Letting You
3:49
$0.49
$0.99
04
Discipline
4:19
$0.49
$0.99
05
Echoplex
4:45
$0.49
$0.99
06
Head Down
4:55
$0.49
$0.99
07
Lights In the Sky
3:29
$0.49
$0.99
08
Corona Radiata
7:33
$0.49
$0.99
09
The Four of Us Are Dying
4:37
$0.49
$0.99
10
Demon Seed
4:59
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 43:47

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user avatar

free from nin.com

MzMariah

Already loving a few of these songs and thanks to Trent for giving it away on his site!

user avatar

THIS IS A FREE ALBUM!!!!

Lost_Johnny

Look on NIN's site. This is a free download!

user avatar

Just stop!

slackerjesus666

This album was free and I still deleted it. I really wish Trent would get back on drugs and find another abusive relationship to write about so he'd make another great CD. He's gone soft and political. I can't take this crap from him anymore. With Teeth was decent, Year Zero was pushing it and now this is crap. I'd give it away too. I couldn't feel good about selling this.

user avatar

freeeee

purposdriven

this album is available at nin.com in a variety of formats and quality levels. Its only supposed to be sold for a hard copy. in fact, you could legally download this free from anywhere from anywhere, it's copyright is only to preserve acknowledgment of its rightful creator. what's goin on emusic??????????

user avatar

as a matter of fact...

bookingjohnny

KMFDM tours almost non stop in europe and the states, and even though it is pretty much the same show every year since En-Esche left and took everybody with him- i still enjoy going to see them live. In my business i get to see bands every night, and i have not seen NitzerEbb since Depeche Mode in 90' (world violation) but i have seen KMFDM like 15 or 20 times... as well as Ministry and a slew of other bands who chose to make music not so "mainstream" like NIN... I am curious if you are one of those NIN fans who gallently boo'd Rezner off stage while opening for skid row, and then shuffled quietly in line a couple years later to buy the downward spiral....?

user avatar

The only free album not worth the money

MrFurious

Really, this is terrible. Never thought someone could write music derivitive of their own work. I downloaded this for free from their website and want my money back. I've been a fan since Pretty Hate Machine and this album just sounds like Reznor got lazy.

user avatar

downld for free

bic

download for free at www.nin.com J. Edward Keyes get your head out your arse it is only music. NIN "are just a band"

user avatar

Free album- this is free...

catharsisis

why would you buy this here....go to his website and download it for free. www.nin.com

eMusic Features

2

Icon: Trent Reznor

By Andrew Parks, Contributor

It's hard to fathom how Trent Reznor went from being a wiry, mud-caked madman (what up, Woodstock '94?) to a ripped Oscar winner, but one thing's clear at this point in his career: While his contemporaries are busy shilling Absinthe (sorry, Mansinthe) and struggling to remain relevant in a restless alt-rock landscape, Nine Inch Nails' string-yanking singer/songwriter is in it for the long haul. Part of it has to do with the agonizing level of perfectionism… more »

2

Icon: Trent Reznor

By Andrew Parks, Contributor

It's hard to fathom how Trent Reznor went from being a wiry, mud-caked madman (what up, Woodstock '94?) to a ripped Oscar winner, but one thing's clear at this point in his career: While his contemporaries are busy shilling Absinthe (sorry, Mansinthe) and struggling to remain relevant in a restless alt-rock landscape, Nine Inch Nails' string-yanking singer/songwriter is in it for the long haul. Part of it has to do with the agonizing level of perfectionism… more »

4

Comeback Kids: The 10 Best Musical Resurrections

By Arye Dworken, Contributor

Remember that band you loved that broke up? Well, next year, they're playing Coachella. We live in an age when band reunions are bordering on passé, which can obscure the fact that a well-executed comeback is often difficult to come by. Take Limp Bizkit. That once incredibly popular band released an album this year that you probably had had no idea existed. Or on a somewhat more credible note, Duran Duran reunited and recruited famed… more »

0

Six Degrees of Nine Inch Nails’ The Downward Spiral

By Aaron Burgess, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Nine Inch Nails’ The Downward Spiral

By Aaron Burgess, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Hard to believe that at one point Trent Reznor was seen as the quintessential perfectionist, squirreled away in a decaying Victorian house, sweating over each individual track he created, spending upwards of six years between albums. He’s shattered that image in the new millennium, especially after his 2007 divorce from Interscope, a parting of the ways that left him free to release albums when and how he chose. Reznor immediately embraced that opportunity, releasing the instrumental double-album Ghosts I-IV without announcement in March 2008, then quickly following it two months later with The Slip, a full-fledged vocal album. Such rapid succession served notice that Reznor intended to take full advantage of his freedom, and its availability as a free lossless download prior to its physical release couldn’t help but be seen as a veiled stab at Radiohead’s variable pricing for In Rainbows, a move Trent called a “marketing gimmick,” a charge that can’t quite be leveled against Nine Inch Nails as Reznor encouraged fans to post The Slip elsewhere, to give it away to friends, to remix their tracks if they wished. Unlike Ghosts, which seemed designed with remixing and sampling in mind, The Slip doesn’t cry out for recontextualization in order to make sense: it’s riveting on its own terms.
Mercilessly tight and efficient where Year Zero was majestic and sprawling, The Slip is the most user-friendly Nine Inch Nails album ever. At only ten tracks, there is no fat on its bones. It does not offer a slow build, it leaps into action with the lacerating “1,000,000,” maintaining a blistering intensity for half the record before eventually winding its way to softer moments for the album’s conclusion. There is no learning curve to The Slip, it does not require effort to decode a narrative, it does not slowly unfold its own internal logic, it comes on with a tightly controlled force that’s present even in the quietest moments, as they pulsate with coiled tension. The Slip is so easy to digest because Trent Reznor is in consolidation mode, relying on his strengths instead of punishingly pushing himself forward. Such obsession with progress weighed down The Fragile and With Teeth, turning them into intricate puzzle boxes for devotees, but Reznor began to break free with the quite magnificent Year Zero, whose dense narrative likely alienated many fans. Here on The Slip, he retains the sense of urgency that flowed through Year Zero, but as it’s a lean album, it’s easier to appreciate his mastery of darkness and light or his ability to construct throbbing melodic hooks out of noise. Here, he’s no longer a stylized, self-conscious innovator, he’s a working musician enraptured by making music, and he’s so invigorated by creation it’s hard not to get sucked in as well. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

more »