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Drift

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (268 ratings)

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Drift album cover
01
Quest
1:36
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02
Fog
3:42
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03
Coat of Arms
3:28
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04
IOIO
3:24
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05
1685/Bach
2:48
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06
Caves
3:47
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07
Light #1
2:55
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08
Light #2
3:10
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09
2222
1:59
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10
Us
3:06
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11
Voices
3:20
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12
Lords
3:37
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 36:52

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Wondering Sound

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Andrew Parks

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When he's not filing news stories, shooting a live show or contributing the occasional feature for Wondering Sound, Andrew Parks edits and publishes self-titled...more »

05.27.09
A SoCal kid fills in the link between dubstep, glitch-hop, and IDM
2009 | Label: Alpha Pup Records

Much like LA's other leading beat conductors (Flying Lotus, Daedelus, Nobody), Nosaj Thing refuses to sit still . His universally-acclaimed Drift does just that, drudging up dubstep, IDM and glitch-hop detritus like a space station intercepting the scrambled beats of J Dilla and Dr. Dre. Which makes perfect sense. After all, Jason Chung spent his formative SoCal years flipping between classic rap stations and noise-rock shows at the Smell. That'd… read more »

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"Surreal, Amazing...."

DanRojo

This is an amazing album, i came to hear one of the samples by simple chance and i was pretty hooked since ... Love the up n' down beats pretty surreal to the bones.. keep up the good work NT.

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Seminal

clem-mcculloch

Pulsing, shifting, beat-driven soundscapes comparable to FlyLo and other beat scientists but a bit more sinister.

user avatar

Awesome Album.

CheeseSeven7

Amazing beat structures while still being ambient enough for background music! Honestly I don't see the comparison to Flying Lotus other than that they live in the same city, they have very different sounds. Nosaj for the win!

user avatar

I Love This Record

UncoolMusicCritic

There is not a day that I do not play something off this album. I just find Jason Chung's work amazing. I hope to catch him at Sonar Chicago this fall. Whatever he does, it is mind blowing.

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Sick, Deep, Layered, Groovy

cboog

If you like to get your chair-dancing headphone groove on, this is some serious deep goodness.

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More of the same

fulofunk

Not much new here or original. Nice beats, but nothing that caught my ear enough to listen through twice

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wobbly is the new IDM

mtchl

Plenty of 90s / IDM / RnB influences to spot but this is more original than that: wobbly, body-jacking funk all chopped into digital pieces, intricate production and tons of musical ideas. Best electronica of 09 so far.

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you decide

texxeen

LA kid on the dub eletro hype stuff, the stuff is from LA how good can it really be?. wanna be electronic experimental madlib meets flying lotus meets garbage.

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not bad

EMUSIC-01E707B1

you honestly cant compare this to burial...this is pretty good however nosaj does steal a lot of typical classical harmonies and church music...basically the same pieces just synthesized...buy some Bach

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No such thing as Nosaj's thing

Sailencethenoise

Best new music 2009!!! Much better than Burial, desperately catchy 'glitch-hop'. Download recommendations; "Fog" "Lords" "Caves".

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They Say All Music Guide

California has long been a prime breeding ground for instrumental hip-hop, from DJ Shadow’s pioneering work in the form through Madlib’s tireless explorations and iterations, and that’s never been more true than in the late 2000s, as a cresting wave of interest in the work of the late J Dilla helped to spark something of a stylistic resurgence, while a handful of Los Angeles-based producers coalesced into a recognizable local scene centered around the venue Low End Theory. That scene’s first prominent breakout star was Steve Ellison, aka Flying Lotus, who earned widespread notice with his 2008 Warp debut Los Angeles, but 24-year-old Jason Chung (Nosaj Thing) followed shortly thereafter, dropping his aptly named LP, Drift, the subsequent spring. As with FlyLo’s work, Nosaj pushes well beyond the customary bounds of hip-hop into glitchy IDM, ambient, and even dubstep territory, foregrounding highly abstract electronic textures more reminiscent of artists like Prefuse 73, Aphex Twin, and Burial than the beatmakers referenced above, with hip-hop’s rhythmic drive never entirely absent but often reduced to a spare, skeletal framework. But despite some clear stylistic parallels, Drift is a notably more austere, measured work that feels classically restrained in comparison to the fragmentary, static-soaked clutter of Los Angeles. With a distinctive sonic palette of muted squelchy synths, wordless vocals, and largely inorganic-sounding percussion, the album is curiously playful in spite of its somber, almost funereal tone, as it floats from the airy twinkles and reverberant handclaps of the opening “Quest” to the denser, menacingly murky electro-funk of “Coat of Arms” and the sinuous “1685/Bach.” The album’s latter half takes on an unexpectedly spiritual cast, partially due to Nosaj’s use of decidedly churchy, organ-like textures. Though brooding, minor-key tonality and middle-range tempos remain dominant nearly throughout, the brief, nearly beatless “2222″ and hazily serene “Us” introduce a welcome note of warmth and reassurance, before the murmurs and heartbeats of “Voices” usher in “Lords”‘ climactic, doom-laden choral fantasia. It’s quite a stunning sequence, and evidence of the breadth of Nosaj Thing’s compositional prowess, which extends from a fine ear for minute detail to a rare sense of album-length sweep. – K. Ross Hoffman

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