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Aldhils Arboretum

Rate It! Avg: 3.5 (117 ratings)
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Aldhils Arboretum album cover
01
Doing Nothing
3:23
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02
Old People In The Cemetery
3:20
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03
Isn't It Nice?
2:55
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04
Jennifer Louise
2:00
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05
The Blank Husband Epidemic
2:39
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06
Pancakes For One
2:41
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07
We Are Destroying The Song
2:47
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08
An Ode To The Nocturnal Muse
3:43
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09
Predictably Sulking Sara
2:27
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10
Natalie And Effie In The Park
2:12
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11
A Question For Emily Foreman
2:42
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12
Kissing In The Grass
3:39
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13
Kid Without Claws
3:56
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14
Death Dance Of Omipapas And Sons For You
2:23
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 40:47

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better in theory than in reality

dutchman4life

It's hard to objectively view this album knowing that it bridges the gap between the rambling, unfocused twee of their earlier output and the brilliant, honed pop that was soon to come. Viewed through this perspective, the album is fascinating for what it is - unfortunately, aside from a handful of tracks, it's ultimately not worth seriously listening to more than once. for collectors only.

user avatar

Their Worst

TangerineLemming

Of Montreal puts out some of the best indie pop songs, but this album is completely devoid of anything worthwhile (except track 2). Nearly each song is painful, and it's the only album I've ever heard that made me want to throw up while listening to it. Yeah, that's bad. But, it all comes down to taste, doesn't it? Some love it, I hate it. Stick with "Sunlandic Twins," "The Gay Parade," and "Hissing Fauna." This album belongs in the gutter.

user avatar

Great!

lvkelly

Of Montreal has fast become one of my favorite bands. I would highly recommend any of their CD's, and they put on a great live act as well!

user avatar

Loathing

ecru

I abhor and detest the guy's voice. Every time I give them a try, I'll think, "Gee, this isn't so bad" but then I'm relieved when he stops singing. I seem to be the only one who thinks this, though.

user avatar

An awkward transition.

boatofcar

This album marks the turning point in which Of Montreal changes from neo-vaudville musical act to baroque pop studio artists. The result is a mishmash of a few music hall tunes similar to those found on Coquelicot Asleep in the Poppies paired with their attempts to finely craft a catchy pop song. Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band influence runs rampant, especially on songs like The Blank Husband Epidemic. Unfortunately, there are far too many gems in this lackluster collection of songs, particularly in the face of their more recent output. Buy this if you're a committed fan--otherwise skip it and proceed directly to Satanic Panic in the Attic.

user avatar

Great indie

Gonsiska

Reminds me a lot of Beach Boys / Syd Barrett stuff. Great songs, catchy, you can listen to them over and over. If you dig The Shins and the like, go for it. These guys are pretty well established, this is one of their best, IMO.

user avatar

download the Sunlandic Twins first

hotness

"The Sunlandic Twins" is the best album I've downloaded this year- so maybe my expectations were too high for this album. It's a little rough around the edges for happy music, both the singing and lyrics seem thrown together at the last minute. Maybe I think too much. If you do too, this is not your album.

eMusic Features

3

Schizo-Pop! A Guide to Musicians and Their Alternate Personae

By Laura Studarus, Contributor

Whether it's on account of creativity bursting at the seams, or just a desire to try something musically or lyrically different from their previous work, sometimes artists feel the need to step outside themselves and create an entirely new persona. The syndrome that's kept psychologists busy for years has manifested itself in concept albums, live performances or just the occasional one-off single. Inspired by Nicki Minaj's sophomore album Roman Reloaded — where Minaj channels her… more »

0

New This Week: Sharon Van Etten, Twilight Sad & More

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

OK! Are you guys ready to get bummed out? Because it's the week before Valentine's Day and, man, do we have some sad records for you. I mean, sad even for indie rock, which has sad basically branded into its DNA. So if you're ready to be heartbroken, let's get going. Sharon Van Etten, Tramp: Basically, the only record you need today. A great leap forward from her previous, folky outings, Tramp finds Van Etten falling… more »

0

Interview: Of Montreal

By Barry Walters, Contributor

Whether cavorting around the stage in ballet tights or turning his psyche onto skewed, Technicolor pop songs, Of Montreal main man Kevin Barnes puts so much of himself on display that it almost seems impolite to look. For over 15 years he's commandeered his continuously mutating studio project and live band, while simultaneously exploring his own multiple personalities, sexualities and spiritualities. Invigorating the psychedelic soul of 2008's Skeletal Lamping and 2010's False Priest with free jazz… more »

0

Six Degrees of Cyndi Lauper’s She’s So Unusual

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Cyndi Lauper’s She’s So Unusual

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Interview: Of Montreal’s Kevin Barnes

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

Ten years ago, Kevin Barnes would have seemed like the least-likely-to-succeed satellite of the Athens, Georgia-based Elephant 6 troupe, a loose collective of bands and artists that became a mini-phenomenon among indie-rock fans in the mid-to-late-'90s. Barnes 'group, Of Montreal, were maybe the most whimsical of the E6'ers; their early records, even ones as good as 1999's The Gay Parade, were more notable for what they weren't (meaning, actually from the '60s) as for what… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Intended as an “album of singles” in favor of diminishing their normal proclivities toward conceptual grandiosity and musical adventurousness, Aldhils Arboretum marks a peculiar change of pace for Elephant 6′s most prolific popsters. About six songs and 20 minutes shorter than the average Of Montreal outing, the band manages to retain a good deal of their trademark zaniness while producing what might be their most focused and polished work. In fact, the band has never sounded stronger instrumentally as a straightforward retro-rock unit. Big ringing keyboards and wild veering guitar lines color unshakable ear candy like “Doing Nothing” and “Jennifer Louise,” both tracks that rank among their most catchy, if not the most innovative, in their extensive catalog. Of course, Kevin Barnes still indulges a bit in his tendency toward obscurely surreal narrative, with both “The Blank Husband Epidemic” and “An Ode to the Nocturnal Muse” being unpredictably odd ventures into his unique imagination. Further, even though the intricately playful nature of some of their best songwriting is somewhat muted, Barnes does manage to extend his reputation for gorgeously florid balladry on a few tracks. All in all, even though they don’t have an overarching concept to rest under, the set of songs present is undeniably strong and ultimately stamped with all of the important elements that make Of Montreal’s brand of psychedelic pop so exemplary. – Matt Fink

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