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Cherry Peel

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (58 ratings)
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Cherry Peel album cover
01
Everything Disappears When You Come Around
2:33
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02
Baby
2:31
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03
I Can't Stop Your Memory
3:25
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04
When Your Loved Like You Are
2:33
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05
Don't Ask Me To Explain
2:46
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06
In Dreams I Dance With You
2:05
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07
Sleeping In The Beetle Bug
2:18
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08
Tim I Wish You Were Born A Girl
1:46
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09
Montreal
2:30
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10
This Feeling (Dereks Theme)
2:42
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11
I Was Watching Your Eyes
1:51
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12
Springtime Is The Season
2:13
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13
At Night Trees Aren't Sleeping
1:49
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14
You've Got A Gift
4:50
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 35:52

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Lo-fi happy pop

carlieart

Cherry Peel has loads of lo-fi charm. In terms of creativity, Of Montreal's early albums actually trump their later, more electronic albums; and as their earliest production, this album proves that Kevin Barnes has been an amazingly creative lyricist from the start.

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One of my favorites

hoboghost

Kevin Barnes sings memorable tunes with lyrics perfectly balanced between imagination and simple yet beautiful honesty: "Even though my feelings aren't returned, And in time I won't think about you this way, That still doesn't stop me, If just for now, wishing we were each other's baby."

eMusic Features

3

Schizo-Pop! A Guide to Musicians and Their Alternate Personae

By Laura Studarus, Contributor

Whether it's on account of creativity bursting at the seams, or just a desire to try something musically or lyrically different from their previous work, sometimes artists feel the need to step outside themselves and create an entirely new persona. The syndrome that's kept psychologists busy for years has manifested itself in concept albums, live performances or just the occasional one-off single. Inspired by Nicki Minaj's sophomore album Roman Reloaded — where Minaj channels her… more »

0

New This Week: Sharon Van Etten, Twilight Sad & More

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

OK! Are you guys ready to get bummed out? Because it's the week before Valentine's Day and, man, do we have some sad records for you. I mean, sad even for indie rock, which has sad basically branded into its DNA. So if you're ready to be heartbroken, let's get going. Sharon Van Etten, Tramp: Basically, the only record you need today. A great leap forward from her previous, folky outings, Tramp finds Van Etten falling… more »

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Interview: Of Montreal

By Barry Walters, Contributor

Whether cavorting around the stage in ballet tights or turning his psyche onto skewed, Technicolor pop songs, Of Montreal main man Kevin Barnes puts so much of himself on display that it almost seems impolite to look. For over 15 years he's commandeered his continuously mutating studio project and live band, while simultaneously exploring his own multiple personalities, sexualities and spiritualities. Invigorating the psychedelic soul of 2008's Skeletal Lamping and 2010's False Priest with free jazz… more »

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Six Degrees of Cyndi Lauper’s She’s So Unusual

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

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Six Degrees of Cyndi Lauper’s She’s So Unusual

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Interview: Of Montreal’s Kevin Barnes

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

Ten years ago, Kevin Barnes would have seemed like the least-likely-to-succeed satellite of the Athens, Georgia-based Elephant 6 troupe, a loose collective of bands and artists that became a mini-phenomenon among indie-rock fans in the mid-to-late-'90s. Barnes 'group, Of Montreal, were maybe the most whimsical of the E6'ers; their early records, even ones as good as 1999's The Gay Parade, were more notable for what they weren't (meaning, actually from the '60s) as for what… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Hailing from the ’90s-resurgent Athens, GA, scene, unofficial home base to the Elephant 6 collective, Of Montreal is perhaps the least publicized band in the Elephant 6 stable but not because they make the least-worthy music. To the contrary, Cherry Peel is one of the most unabashedly pretty releases from that group, and, in fact, stands apart from most everything in the pop scene due to its simple, unassuming innocence. The vocals of songwriter Kevin Barnes are achingly heartfelt and puppyish, and his songs seem to spring directly out of childhood, or at least seem touched by a childlike yearning, so much so that you can’t help feeling all fuzzy inside and perhaps desirous of hugging someone, maybe your mom, after hearing them. And the songs are uniformly expert: “In Dreams I Dance With You” comes across like a cupid-struck Pinocchio’s sweet longing; “Montreal” is a wasteland ballad worthy of Neil Young; and “Don’t Ask Me to Explain” will make your heart palpitate and bubble up into your throat it is so unpretentiously euphonic. The closest cousin to Of Montreal is probably the Apples in Stereo, and like that band, the influence of the Beatles, particularly Paul McCartney, and the Beach Boys is pervasive, and other ’60s music such as Brill Building pop and the Lovin’ Spoonful (“Everything Dissappears When You Come Around”) and a bit of psychedelia, as well as a pinch of new wave, occasionally reaches the surface of the songs. But Of Montreal touches on so many other sources than those, such as circus music and, on “I Can’t Stop Your Memory,” even a bit of jazz, and the entire album has the sentiment and conviction of early-20th century, old-timey, and Tin Pan Alley tunes. The gorgeous lushness of Cherry Peel conceals the bedroom-bred genesis of the entire undertaking. And though it would be easy to dismiss the whole album as so much cuteness, Of Montreal never hint at irony. The band is not mocking pop, it loves the form and the chance to express that joy; and that joy is on full display on Cherry Peel like no band since the early Beatles. – Stanton Swihart

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