|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Dr. No's Oxperiment

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (119 ratings)
Retail
Member
Dr. No's Oxperiment album cover
01
Heavy
1:54
$0.49
$0.99
02
Gladius
1:22
$0.49
$0.99
03
Higher
1:33
$0.49
$0.99
04
Breakout
1:25
$0.49
$0.99
05
Ox Broil
1:52
$0.49
$0.99
06
Bouncers
1:36
$0.49
$0.99
07
Alarmsss
1:25
$0.49
$0.99
08
Banger
1:31
$0.49
$0.99
09
No Guest List
1:20
$0.49
$0.99
10
Land Mine
1:29
$0.49
$0.99
11
My Luck
1:45
$0.49
$0.99
12
Cosmos
1:49
$0.49
$0.99
13
Exp Out The Ox
1:01
$0.49
$0.99
14
Emergency
1:42
$0.49
$0.99
15
Ohhhhhh
1:00
$0.49
$0.99
16
Deliveries
1:07
$0.49
$0.99
17
Come Back
1:05
$0.49
$0.99
18
Hot Fire
1:35
$0.49
$0.99
19
Action
1:38
$0.49
$0.99
20
Ghetto
1:30
$0.49
$0.99
21
Fast Gamble
1:05
$0.49
$0.99
22
All Over
0:49
$0.49
$0.99
23
Mad Piano
1:33
$0.49
$0.99
24
Oxcity Sickness
1:45
$0.49
$0.99
25
Cassette
1:43
$0.49
$0.99
26
Down Under
0:38
$0.49
$0.99
27
Smokey Winds
1:21
$0.49
$0.99
28
Slow Down
1:13
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 28   Total Length: 39:46

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

J. Edward Keyes

Editor-in-Chief

Joe Keyes writes about music.

04.22.11
Oh No, Dr. No's Oxperiment
Label: Stones Throw

Think of it as Donuts gone global: a cross-cultural polymorph that fires '70s psych and grimy funk through a ten-ton bouzouki.

The Dr. behind the decks has had a bit of a fitful career. After an adequate but unremarkable debut, Oh No issued Exodus into Unheard Rhythms, a whalloping piece of turntable funk that sliced up and reconfigured the crazy rhythms of '60s soundtrack composer Galt McDermot. The resulting record was… read more »

Write a Review 8 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

OK, it might not be Donuts, but it's killer

ben917

These beats range from banging to laid back, but there is a quality to the music that a lot of DJs and producers never reach--something truly original.

user avatar

THIS IS NOT DONUTS!

MRMCQUAY

Not to diss but this IS NOT Donuts! Period point blank. There will never be another Donuts. That said, this mighty tight and worthy of DL. Surprisingly, his style is different enough from his brother's to make it a refreshing listen. This collection of beats was beautifully crafted! It is simply not fair that so much talent runs in that family. With this one, Oh No stands on his own beside his brother as one of the best beat bangers in the game. Anyone into instrumentals and beats will LOVE this one!

user avatar

I Agree ...

DJJAMAL

I agree with MRMCQUAY, this is no DONUTS, but an awesome set of grooves just the same. It proves a point I have been trying to make as of late that instrumentalism is just as important to/relevant in hip-hop nowadays as the music with vocals from the greats of the game, and is no longer just for the DJ or the die-hard fan. If U like beats, U'll dig this one. Cop it.

user avatar

translation of french review/comment

MiDoJo

(rough translation from AltaVista Babel Fish) If the pillars of its work are always the same ones, Oh No A this time covered with new colors, those which it went to seek in the musics of the world, and more precisely in Turkey, in Lebanon, in Greece or Italy. If the receipt can appear a little special on paper, it manages to occidentalize it with enough delicacy not to denature it, and at the same time to return it completely digeste. Oh No thus takes us along travels, and encourages from there with discovered as with the broadmindedness www.bokson.net

user avatar

chronique de bokson.net

bokson

Si les piliers de son oeuvre sont toujours les mêmes, Oh No les a cette fois recouvert de nouvelles couleurs, celles qu'il est allé chercher dans les musiques du monde, et plus précisément en Turquie, au Liban, en Grèce ou en Italie. Si la recette peut paraître un peu spéciale sur le papier, il parvient à l'occidentaliser avec assez de délicatesse pour ne pas la dénaturer, et en même temps la rendre totalement digeste. Oh No nous emmène donc en voyage, et incite à la découverte comme à l'ouverture d'esprit. www.bokson.net

user avatar

Go!

ArmondoMfume

No's beats are incredibly well crafted, but some of the sheen seems to be too intentionally scrubbed away to seem less...polished. Being more structured than Donuts or BK means less character, but maybe some people prefer a more "mapped out" record. With Donuts and BK:MS, the songs are all their own characters, whereas Oxperiment has long stretches of sameness, maybe a half dozen tracks that are their own beasts. Dilla/Madlib use far more vocal samples than No. It's easier to identify individual tracks with more vocal samples, but some might prefer the more beat tape approach No takes. Donuts/BK are more fractured, No's record is meticulously programmed for 40 minutes straight. This is an easy five star record, and will make love to your stereo with the heavy bass hittin and all that. The percussion reminds me of Bumps, which is a good thing. Download all now or stop listening to music, this is a major work by Oh No and should be listened to by fans of all music.

user avatar

Very impressive

JWBIII

Madlib's little brother is definitely starting to give him a run for his money. This is a great listen from start to finish, and easily the best intrumental hip-hop album so far in 2007. The sound is somewhat of a blend of the great J Dilla's "Donuts" and Dr. Who Dat's (aka Jneiro Jarel) "Beat Journey." Another classic in the Stones Throw catalogue.

user avatar

very solid.

sixfive

Just check out 'cosmos'. This is some out there sh*t.. well done, oh no.

eMusic Features

0

New This Week: Cloud Nothings, Craig Finn and More

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

The first HUGE new release day of 2012, so strap in and get ready for a pretty comprehensive rundown! Dave Sumner's got your jazz picks, and I've got the rest. Here we go! Cloud Nothings, Attack on Memory: ALBUM OF THE DAY. Dylan Baldi grows up in a nanosecond, making a snarling rock record that hurtles forward with the speed and fury of a meteor. The sonic touchstones here are '90s emo greats like Jawbreaker, the… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Following in the tradition of other notable producers, Oh No flexes his talent on his third solo release, the beat record Dr. No’s Oxperiment. Inspired by and sampled from Turkish, Lebanese, Italian, and Greek psychedelic rock, the album is much more melodic and full-sounding than anything Madlib might do, but Oh No’s always been more tune-driven, and less concerned with jolty, sparse beats (though that kind of thing occasionally makes its way here) than his brother, and so looking for Beat Konducta Jr. material here would be a misguided approach. Dr. No’s Oxperiment ends up sounding a lot more like a DJ Shadow or RJD2 album than something by Dilla or the Alchemist, the 28 tracks (all of which are under two minutes) working together to complete the whole, a kind of warm, nearly-poppy, guitar-filled trip into Middle Eastern chants, tight bass grooves, and drums that hover beneath the surface. That’s one of Oh No’s greatest talents, in fact: his ability to mix the different elements of his compositions so that none of them stick out too much but are all completely present, important and perceptible. The kick, the snare, are both there, are keeping the tracks in line, but unless an overt attempt is made to pick them out, they blend so cleanly into the strings, the keys, the vocal samples, that they’re sometimes hard to hear. And unlike his brother, Oh No is not afraid of major keys and poppy chord progressions, even occasionally venturing into something that’s vaguely catchy, and not just the avant-garde left-field modal wanderings that so dominate Madlib’s beats. It’s not that Oh No is a less advanced producer than his brother, it’s just that he focuses on different things: inclusion instead of obscurity, harmony instead of atonality. Dr. No’s Oxperiment is a beat album, that much is sure, but it’s more than that, it’s more than music for the obsessed crate digger. It’s rich and vibrant, like a marketplace, crates of oranges and nuts and olives sitting in the shade, the sound of vendors hacking their wares, everything necessary to the proceedings around it, a perfectly orchestrated expedition into an exotic landscape that somehow, at the same time, feels very, very familiar, all of which makes the record an exciting and very satisfying listen. – Marisa Brown

more »