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Down the River of Golden Dreams

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (428 ratings)
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Down the River of Golden Dreams album cover
01
Down the River of Golden Dreams
1:15
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02
It Ends With a Fall
3:55
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03
For the Enemy
6:09
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Blanket and Crib
2:51
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05
The War Criminal Rises and Speaks
5:11
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06
The Velocity of Saul at the Time of His Conversion
4:25
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Dead Faces
2:36
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Maine Island Lovers
4:51
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Song About a Star
3:30
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Yellow
6:14
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11
Seas Too Far to Reach
5:01
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 45:58

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River of greatness!

Dark1

Album is great!

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quality, a must-have!

mainelonestar

this is an incredibly beautiful album. okkervil river is my all-time favorite band, and this album i think might be my favorite. try "seas too far to reach" and "dead faces."

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One man's warble...

MisterCharlie

A band's vocalist is often the doorway into the music. If you don't like the singer, it'll be hard to like the band. If you don't like the bass parts, well, that's not such a big deal, right? I don't dislike the singer, though, the delivery and intent seem earnest, his voice is just PITCHY, too often. This albums SOUNDS really good, the ebb and flow of the music is well-crafted w/ vintage-y keyboards & mandolin and pedal steel snaking through the guitar/bass/drums. Slower tempos than your average rock band. But there are too many times I just can't get past the sound of the singer's out-of-tune-ness. It's frustrating cuz at times he sounds GREAT and I just wish they took the time to make the WHOLE thing sound great. “It's all about the vibe" is an excuse for out-of-tune vocals. Van Morrison emotes like crazy but he always seemed to stay within the song, imo. Naming a song "The Velocity of Saul at the Time of His Conversion", though, is almost worth 1 star all on its own!

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Listentothisonyourdeathbed

Eggman

I am reviewing this because noone else has and I can't believe that. This album is as good as anything else of theirs and equally worth owning. In fact, I think this is put together better than any of their other albums, it is saturated with feeling, grace, and longing. By the time you hit "Song about a Star" crank it up that extra notch and let the accordian wash you away...

eMusic Features

0

Interview: Okkervil River

By Hilary Hughes, Contributor

Memories of adolescence tend to be peppered with moments of mortification: Puberty, first kisses, monumental heartbreaks, awkward attempts at experimentation, initial encounters with real world vices and the last dwindling bits of innocence between the final days of grade school and the moment we move into our freshman dorms. Revisiting these milestones can be a painful endeavor, but for Will Sheff of Okkervil River, it proved inspiring. Their first record since 2011's I Am Very Far,… more »

2

36 Songs To Soothe the Pain

By Wondering Sound Staff, Contributor

Whether you're happily married or told Cupid to shove it a long time ago, we can all agree on one thing: to quote the one-and-only Nazareth, "Love hurts/ Love scars/ Love wounds/ And mars." Or something. That's why we went ahead and compiled a list of 36 Songs To Soothe the Pain, from the bloodletting confessionals of Neko Case, Bright Eyes and Sunny Day Real Estate to the melancholic melodies of Sigur Rós, the Shangri-Las… more »

0

Six Degrees of The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds

By Rachael Maddux, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of The Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds

By Rachael Maddux, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Interview: Okkervil River’s Will Sheff

By Amanda Petrusich, Contributor

There's no better anchor for Okkervil River's brawny, brainy art-rock than the band's hyper-articulate frontman, Will Sheff: His vocals rush and recede, swell and shrink, changing every few bars to better suit the stories he tells. eMusic's Amanda Petrusich spoke with Sheff — fresh off a week of doctor-ordered voice-rest — about ditching the concept album, living in New York, keeping quiet and pursuing "a bigness that's not polite." I'm glad to hear that you're able to… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Down the River of Golden Dreams is the record Okkervil River has been threatening to make since its 2000 issue, Stars Too Small to Use. Songwriter Will Sheff has turned out his nicest batch of tunes here and reined in his voice just enough to communicate his ideas without pushing too hard, while simultaneously keeping the urgency and emotive qualities he showcased on the predecessor to this record, Don’t Fall in Love with Everyone You See. Because of this, Down the River of Golden Dreams is easily the group’s most cohesive record to date, and solidifies Okkervil River as a band worthy of scrutiny. The fluidity of Sheff’s thoughtful lyrics align with his ability to play with tension, which comes across rather nicely on the jaunty “It Ends with a Fall,” the dynamic epic “The War Criminal Rises and Speaks,” and the delicate “Maine Island Lovers.” The band has grown into a tighter unit with a knack for some nice arrangements — which again was hinted at on Okkervil River’s previous releases, but not fully realized until now. Liberal use of Rhodes, Hammond organ, and Mellotrons is the catalyst of these songs, leading the strings and horns through crescendos and textural landscapes without losing the raw nature that has always suited Okkervil River’s honesty and desire to connect with the listener on an emotional level very well. – Gregory McIntosh

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