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...and they have escaped the weight of darkness

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...and they have escaped the weight of darkness album cover
01
Þú ert sólin
3:25
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02
Þú ert jörðin
4:34
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03
Tunglið
4:27
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04
Loftið verður skyndilega kalt
5:48
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05
Kjurrt
4:44
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06
Gleypa okkur
5:48
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07
Hægt, kemur ljósið
5:33
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08
Undan hulu
5:08
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09
Þau hafa sloppið undan þunga myrkursins
4:01
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 9   Total Length: 43:28

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

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Jayson Greene

Senior Editor

Jayson Greene is Senior Editor at Wondering Sound and a contributing editor and columnist at Pitchfork. His writing has also appeared in GQ, the Village Voice,

04.30.10
If you have a rainy window to stare at longingly anytime soon, this is your soundtrack
2010 | Label: Erased Tapes / Finetunes

Olafur Arnalds' forlorn little piano-and-strings sketches don't insist upon themselves much. A few glowing, pearly minor chords, soft-pedaled for maximum melancholy; a modest swell of warmth in the strings, and then a softly dying fadeout — and that's pretty much it. A few times, drums nudge their way into the picture, but they don't keep time so much as politely suggest it. The sound level never rises above a murmur.

All of this would scan as… read more »

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Undan hulu

Tree77

Undun hulu is one of the more beautiful arrangements of music that I have heard lately.

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Careful on Mac OS X

Tourne

The album name starts with a dot, which seems to create a hidden folder. So hidden I can't find it at all!

user avatar

super cheesy. avoid.

Idiot

super cheesy. might as well have a muted saxophone playing in the background. would be a lot less pretentious with a title like 'moody times for moody yuppies' AVOID

user avatar

Really quality mediative music

suuuperman

Every time Ive been listning to this album Ive experienced that i'm suddenly in a healthy mediative state. Not like the mass produced new age music. This album is unique. The breaks between the notes and the overall silence - the real instruments sounds and not som bad keboard sound - combined together its pure Ekchart Tolle style - helping you to be in the now. Fantastic

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Lovely Melancholy

Skedman

If you have a rainy window to stare at longingly any time soon, then this definately is the soundtrack!! Its New Years Day 2011, I am staring out at a grey dark morning ... the pictures of the past flash through my minds eye and make me feel old.

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beautiful

davecoons

If you like Sigur Ros, you won't be disappointed here. Just don't expect vocals.

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I expected Erik Satie and got Olafur

BelovedMusic

What can I say I liked it and there isn't much to it. Te rain starts coming down and the mood is set. Play this little tune when you're cleaning and had a fight with your abusive partner you see what I mean, pretty soon the whole penthouse will be clean.

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disappointing

JBB

The slow piano tunes (augmented by strings with the occasional lite rock drum beat) is a big comedown from the magnificent, simple romantic neo-classism of his last recordings. In all, it is a bit like the more syrupy of Sigur Ros’s string enhanced music minus the vocals. It is not terrible...but most pieces are far too close to new age mood music for my ears.

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They Say All Music Guide

They must be putting something in the water over there in Iceland that makes musicians work in unexpected ways. Their biggest pop and rock exports — Björk and Sigúr Ros, respectively — have borne very little relation to what the rest of the world thinks of as pop and rock, so why should their most promising young neo-classical composer be any different? At an age when most young men are still trying to decide between grad school and the night shift at Denny’s, Olafur Arnalds has already made a name for himself as a musical maverick who skirts the edges of the classical, rock, electronic, and avant-garde worlds with enthusiastic ease, a Nico Muhly with a higher tolerance for cold weather, if you will. On his second full-length release, Arnalds moves further away from electronics to embrace a more acoustically oriented approach centered on piano and strings. Electronics do play a supporting role — they’re simply used to enhance the atmosphere here and there, but in the main, Arnalds is creating 21st century chamber music here, as the piano makes simple, elegant statements whose harmonic possibilities are further fleshed out by the strings. And Arnalds may be a modernist in terms of pushing stylistic boundaries, but he still has some old-school, downright romantic notions about melodic movement — you won’t find any polytonality or serial music among these tracks. Arnalds prefers instead to repurpose old-school harmonic conventions in a new context, offering the listener a readily accessible emotional connection but still breaking new ground. And on the few strategic spots in the album where Arnalds drops in drums and/or electric guitar and repetitive motifs, the effect is not dissimilar to the headier moments of the aforementioned Sigúr Ros, or perhaps early-‘70s Pink Floyd at their most ethereal, showing the rock crowd that they too have a point of entry into this music. – James Allen

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