|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Ornette!

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (10 ratings)
Retail
Member
Ornette! album cover
01
W.R.U.
16:25
 
02
T & T
4:36
$0.49
$0.99
03
C. & D.
13:11
 
04
R.P.D.D.
9:39
$0.49
$0.99
05
Proof Readers
10:25
 
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 5   Total Length: 54:16

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

eMusic Features

0

Discover: Atlantic Jazz in the 1960s

By Kevin Whitehead, Contributor

Atlantic may have blossomed as a jazz label in the 1950s, but it established an even stronger presence in the 1960s. As the decade dawned, in-house innovators Charles Mingus, John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman delivered standout work before moving on. The '60s also saw a fresh crop of breakout stars, some of whom started elsewhere but blossomed at Atlantic — among them, blues poet Mose Allison, multi-instrumental roaring lion Rahsaan Roland Kirk, the sly (and… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Recorded a little over a month after his groundbreaking work Free Jazz, this album found Coleman perhaps retrenching from that idea conceptually, but nonetheless plumbing his quartet music to ever greater heights of richness and creativity. Ornette! was the first time bassist Scott LaFaro recorded with Coleman, and the difference in approach between LaFaro and Charlie Haden is apparent from the opening notes of “W.R.U.” There is a more direct propulsion and limberness to his playing, and he can be heard driving Coleman and Don Cherry actively and more aggressively than Haden’s warm, languid phrasing. The cuts, with titles derived from the works of Sigmund Freud, are all gems and serve as wonderful launching pads for the musicians’ improvisations. Coleman, by this time, was very comfortable in extended pieces, and he and his partners have no trouble filling in the time, never coming close to running out of ideas. Special mention should be made of Ed Blackwell, with one of his finest performances. Ornette! is a superb release and a must for all fans of Coleman and creative improvised music in general. – Brian Olewnick

more »