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Remember Me

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (239 ratings)
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Remember Me album cover
01
Trick Or Treat
3:14
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02
Loving By The Pound
2:25
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03
There Goes My Baby
2:21
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Remember Me
2:26
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05
Send Me Some Lovin'
2:16
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06
She's All Right
2:00
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07
Cupid
3:08
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08
The Boston Monkey
2:56
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09
Don't Be Afraid Of Love
3:22
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10
Little Ol' Me
3:11
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11
Pounds And Hundreds
2:19
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12
You Got Good Lovin'
2:57
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13
Gone Again
2:22
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14
I'm Coming Home
3:00
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15
(Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay
2:58
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16
(Sittin' On) The Dock Of The Bay
2:43
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17
Respect
1:49
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18
Open The Door
2:26
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19
I've Got Dreams To Remember
3:42
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20
Come To Me
2:16
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21
Try A Little Tenderness
3:59
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22
Stay In School
1:11
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 22   Total Length: 59:01

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

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Ron Wynn

Contributor

10.14.09
Fresh, soulful spins on undeniable classics
2006 | Label: Stax

No male vocalist — not Ray Charles, Sam Cooke, James Brown or Rev. Al Green — ever sang raw, unreconstructed soul more effectively or memorably than Otis Redding. His voice had an earthy, out-of-the-dirt sound that turned ballads into smoldering heartache triumphs and uptempo tunes into magnetic stompers. Sadly, his tragic death in a 1967 plane crash robbed us of a wonderful artist just coming into his own artistically. This collection of material cut between… read more »

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user avatar

Awesome

15HEAT

If classic Otis Redding is worth some downloads, then I don't know what it is. Classic.

user avatar

STUNNING STUFF!!

Pooch23

Download this NOW, its amazing, that's all i wanna say, hey hey ;-)

user avatar

Complete Your Otis Collection!

BenUptheTree

I thought I had every recording of Otis Redding, but then I saw this. This is an incredible collection of songs I have never heard. Absolutely addictive. Download it now.

user avatar

He Made Me Do IT!

jadeblue

I heard 3 samples and upgraded just to get THIS album. Wonderful I love it!

user avatar

Incredible find

FR666

This album, along with Otis' "Good to me: live at the whiskey a go go" are both fantastic finds on eMusic. The first take of "dock of the bay" on this album (even though it gets cut off) is priceless. I love hearing the producer cut in and tell Otis he'll "never make it as a whistler."

user avatar

Missing a classic

Megalina06

Where is Down in the Valley? That is my absolute favourite Otis Redding song. It seems this album just about covers everything but.....

user avatar

Some Great Big O

stably

Def dl second Dock Of The Bay (16).

user avatar

Where is (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction?

kjc

You can find it on the album called "Stax Profiles Sampler". His rendition is full of passion and heart. Outstanding.

user avatar

great otis album

billyray

this is a truly great otis redding compilation - i don't think it was recorded as an actual album, not sure, but there are many many great songs on it and is definitely worth downloading. i bought it on a whim in high school and still listen to it all the time. there is a great studio recording of "sitting on the dock of the bay" (the second cut, the first is like a warm up), also an incredible rendition of "i've got dreams to remember" - this album is worth it for that track alone. also "open the door" - just amazing enjoy this one, it's incredible - a must for any otis fan

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They Say All Music Guide

For decades it was presumed by fans that the posthumous Otis Redding (acoustic guitar/vocals) studio platters The Dock of the Bay (1968), The Immortal Otis Redding (1968), Love Man (1969), and Tell the Truth (1970) had uncovered all the hidden and unreleased treasures from Redding’s heartbreakingly brief yet appreciatively prolific career. Thankfully, archivist Roger Armstrong — who is perhaps best known for his outstanding contributions to the U.K.-based Ace Records reissue imprint — discovered nearly two dozen additional remnants and presents them on this single-disc anthology. As Stax Records authority Rob Bowman points out in his insightful liner notes essay, the label did not keep precise documentation concerning recording session dates and personnel. So, some detective (and possible guess) work was needed when chronologically placing a few of the lesser-known titles. That certainly doesn’t detract from the experience of uncovering formerly shelved selections such as the greasy and unmistakable Memphis groove behind “Trick or Treat,” or the high-octane horn punctuations on the inaugural take of “Loving by the Pound” that are clearly in the vein of what would turn up as “Respect.” To demonstrate the evolutionary processes and the importance of his collaborative relationship with Steve Cropper (guitar) — a second completely revamped approach rechristened “Pounds and Hundreds (LBs + 100s)” — is offered midway through the compendium. Another treasure is the oft-rumored rendition of the achingly poignant “I’ve Got Dreams to Remember” featuring unique lyrics by Redding’s wife Zelma Redding. Little Richard’s influence is evident on the impassioned overhaul of “Send Me Some Lovin’,” which Redding re-forms with an undeniably singular and inspired interpretation. The alternate versions of “Respect,” “Open the Door,” “Come to Me,” “Try a Little Tenderness,” and the first two attempts of Redding’s swan song, “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay,” are arguably the most revealing moments on the entire package. Perhaps because the originals are so deeply ingrained in the psyche of Redding devotees, hearing the developmental stages or hearing the songs presented in a foreign context is nothing short of soul music manna. The one item that had been available prior to Remember Me (1992) is the concluding “Stay in School” message that was part of a larger campaign producing the promo-only Stay in School, Don’t Be a Dropout long-player. It’s a fun and lighthearted way to wrap up one of the best collections for R&B aficionados or the just plain curious consumer alike. – Lindsay Planer

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