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Aquemini

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (441 ratings)
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Aquemini album cover
01
Hold On Be Strong
1:11
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02
Return Of The "G"
4:49
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03
Rosa Parks
5:24
$0.79
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04
Skew It on the Bar-B
Artist: OutKast feat. Raekwon
3:15
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05
Aquemini
5:19
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06
Synthesizer
Artist: OutKast featuring George Clinton
5:11
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07
Slump
5:09
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08
West Savannah
4:03
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09
Da Art Of Storytellin' (Part 1)
3:43
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10
Da Art Of Storytellin' (Part 2)
2:48
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11
Mamacita
5:52
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12
SpottieOttieDopaliscious
7:07
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13
Y'All Scared
Artist: OutKast featuring T-Mo, Big Gipp and Khujo
4:50
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14
Nathaniel
1:10
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15
Liberation
Artist: OutKast featuring Cee-Lo
8:46
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16
Chonkyfire
6:10
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Album Information
EXPLICIT // EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 16   Total Length: 74:47

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Wondering Sound

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Hua Hsu

Contributor

Hua Hsu edits the hip-hop section of URB Magazine and writes about music, culture and politics for Slate, the Village Voice, The Wire and various other magazine...more »

08.23.12
Outkast, Aquemini
1998 | Label: Arista/LaFace Records

Released a few months after Still Standing, Outkast’s third album marked a turning point for the duo. They produced most of the album themselves and it feels intimately “theirs.” This was an album obsessed with balance, equilibrium, how righteousness and evil complemented one another — even the title was a play on their increasingly unlikely partnership (Big was an Aquarius, Andre a Gemini). This embracing of difference resulted in a record that was both celebratory… read more »

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CLASSIC

ElDopa

It's a musical masterpiece through and through.

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stunning

blrn

if this came out tomorrow, it would still sound like a total, next-level game changer. and i have a feeling that this statement will be true for many, many years to come.

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"Brilliant!"

g3saxman

This is real hip-hop. Original, funky, on some 'next level' stuff. Just get it!

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Dirty South Classic

townzl

Look I'm an older guy (just hit 50) but I'll tell you this is the greatist rap artists to come down the line. Forget all that sampling this is instrumental and they do give their props to the old school such as EWF, and Parliament/ Funkadelic.

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So Hard

SonicDoom

OutKast's first three albums were like a progression into adulthood for me. It's so hard to choose a favorite out of the three, but if someone put a gun to my head it would have to be this one. The complexity, flow, social commentary, and pure uniqueness all came together on this one.

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Outkast's Best Album

Grosho

The fact that this is the third-most downloaded Outkast album blows my mind. Put down Stankonia and pick this up - it's far more consistent and Big Boi and Andre strike the perfect balance between hard and soft, innovation and accessibility. This is hip hop's OK Computer!

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Awesome album

JazzAlbee

Do yourself a favor and download this now. Classic hip hop from one of the best duo's ever. five stars

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wow.

crunchee

as a pizza hut delivery driver in college, i listened to this album so many times it's embarassing. "da art of storytellin'" and "synthesizer" are two of my favorite outkast tracks.

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Perhaps the best record ever.

1Cassiel

I have listened to this one a thousand times and love it everytime. I am a 47 year old white male, from a small town in upstate NY, classically trained professional musician and am known for my brutal honesty when it comes to reviewing music. This one does it all -- Entertainment and education. Production is supremely interesting but serves the music, doesn't over shadow it. My highest recommendation.

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SpottieOttieDopaliscious!

dj_riviera

I've been looking for this track for 10 years.

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They Say All Music Guide

Even compared to their already excellent and forward-looking catalog, OutKast’s sprawling third album, Aquemini, was a stroke of brilliance. The chilled-out space-funk of ATLiens had already thrown some fans for a loop, and Aquemini made it clear that its predecessor was no detour, but a stepping stone for even greater ambitions. Some of ATLiens’ ethereal futurism is still present, but more often Aquemini plants its feet on the ground for a surprisingly down-home flavor. The music draws from a vastly eclectic palette of sources, and the live instrumentation is fuller-sounding than ATLiens. Most importantly, producers Organized Noize imbue their tracks with a Southern earthiness and simultaneous spirituality that come across regardless of what Dre and Big Boi are rapping about. Not that they shy away from rougher subject matter, but their perspective is grounded and responsible, intentionally avoiding hardcore clichés. Their distinctive vocal deliveries are now fully mature, with a recognizably Southern rhythmic bounce but loads more technique than their territorial peers. Those flows grace some of the richest and most inventive hip-hop tracks of the decade. The airy lead single “Rosa Parks” juxtaposes front-porch acoustic guitar with DJ scratches and a stomping harmonica break that could have come from nowhere but the South. Unexpected touches like that are all over the record: the live orchestra on “Return of the ‘G’”; the electronic, George Clinton-guested “Synthesizer”; the reggae horns and dub-style echo of “SpottieOttieDopaliscious”; the hard-rocking wah-wah guitar of “Chonkyfire”; and on and on. What’s most impressive is the way everything comes together to justify the full-CD running time, something few hip-hop epics of this scope ever accomplish. After a few listens, not even the meditative jams on the second half of the album feel all that excessive. Aquemini fulfills all its ambitions, covering more than enough territory to qualify it as a virtuosic masterpiece, and a landmark hip-hop album of the late ’90s. – Steve Huey

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