|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

80/81

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (28 ratings)

We’re sorry. This album is unavailable for download in your country (United States) at this time.

80/81 album cover
Disc 1 of 2
01
Two Folk Songs
Artist: Pat Metheny, Charlie Haden, Jack DeJohnette, Dewey Redman, Mike Brecker
20:52  
02
80/81
Artist: Pat Metheny, Charlie Haden, Jack DeJohnette, Dewey Redman, Mike Brecker
7:34  
03
The Bat
Artist: Pat Metheny, Charlie Haden, Jack DeJohnette, Dewey Redman, Mike Brecker
6:05  
04
Turnaround
Artist: Pat Metheny, Charlie Haden, Jack DeJohnette, Dewey Redman, Mike Brecker
7:05  
Disc 2 of 2
01
Open
Artist: Pat Metheny, Charlie Haden, Jack DeJohnette, Dewey Redman, Mike Brecker
14:34  
02
Pretty Scattered
Artist: Pat Metheny, Charlie Haden, Jack DeJohnette, Dewey Redman, Mike Brecker
7:04  
03
Every Day (I Thank You)
13:21  
04
Goin' Ahead
Artist: Pat Metheny, Charlie Haden, Jack DeJohnette, Dewey Redman, Mike Brecker
3:51  
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 8   Total Length: 80:26

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 4 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Too bad this Pat Metheny's ECM...

kupitero

...release is still not available here at eMusic (U.S. locale) inspite of the latest UMG 250K song November contract. This is one of Pat's best LPs without Lyle Mays and showcased his spectrum of talents. With Mike Brecker gone, we'll never ever have this same ensemble again - incredible jazz session men non-pareil/greats who were at the top of their careers! Jack deJ and Charlie Haden ably laid out the beat while Pat let Mike blow the hell out of each and every track with the exception of the last cut...which I also really love: "Every Day (I Thank You)".

user avatar

What a band!

Grumpyian

Emusic site is giving me ENORMOUS pleasure downloading all the old Metheny albums I couldn't afford to buy all those years ago (but borrowed from the local library!). This is an excellent collection of written and 'free' stuff by players at their best. Sounds even better than I remembered!

user avatar

Ageless - Classic

teapot1

Seeing this on emusic got me playing my album version again (and again). Great live recording of a wonderfull band who all bring out the best playing in each other - highly recommended.

user avatar

Absolute classic

newtherapist

This classic lineup makes 80/81 one of Metheny's timeless offerings, with evocative acoustic arrangements of tracks that went on to become trademark Metheny standards. Essential album for anyone with even the most peripheral interest in Metheny's evolution into arguably the most respected jazz guitarist in the past 100 years.

eMusic Features

1

Interview: Pat Metheny

By Ken Micallef, Contributor

As a teenager, Pat Metheny spent warm summer nights playing guitar with a bizarre religious sect. While not exactly a cult, the whiz-kid with the toothy grin cut his early guitar chops with the Unity Church (now simply called "Unity") of Lee's Summit, Missouri. Many years later, Metheny's track, "Unity Village," an apparent dedication to the experience, appeared on the ECM collection Works II. And throughout his 40 year career, Pat Metheny has unified and… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Pat Metheny’s credibility with the jazz community went way up with the release of this package, a superb two-CD collaboration with a quartet of outstanding jazz musicians that dared to be uncompromising at a time when most artists would have merely continued pursuing their electric commercial successes. From the disbanded Keith Jarrett American quartet came bassist Charlie Haden and tenor Dewey Redman — who alternates with and occasionally plays alongside tenor Michael Brecker — and Jack DeJohnette provides more combustible drumming than Metheny had ever experienced on record before. Yet Metheny’s off-kilter wandering on solo electric guitar is a comfortable fit for the post-bop rhythmic crosscurrents of this music. Indeed, Haden and Metheny are in total sympathy, perhaps celebrating their mutual Missouri roots, and Metheny’s difficult “Pretty Scattered” — which he mockingly described as “Guitar Revenge!” — nearly manages to stump even Redman and Brecker. The first of the “Two Folk Songs” is a great example of the Metheny folk-jazz fusion, with furious strummed guitar underpinning Brecker’s melodic line and excursions on the outside and DeJohnette’s spectacular drums. Another remarkable track is “Open,” a group improvisation that finds DeJohnette shaping the track’s direction with a pushing solo and Metheny and the saxes emerging at the end. The two original LPs were organized so that the more distinctive Metheny fusions were on sides one and four and the overt jazz tracks occupied sides two and three. – Richard S. Ginell

more »