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Hearts And Bones (2011 Remaster)

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Hearts And Bones (2011 Remaster) album cover
01
Allergies
4:39
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02
Hearts and Bones
5:39
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03
When Numbers Get Serious
3:26
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04
Think Too Much (b)
2:45
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05
Song About the Moon
4:11
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06
Think Too Much (a)
3:05
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07
Train in the Distance
5:13
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08
Rene and George Magritte with Their Dog After the War
3:44
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09
Cars Are Cars
3:15
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10
The Late Great Johnny Ace
4:53
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11
Shelter Of Your Arms (Unreleased Work-In-Progress)
3:12
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12
Train in the Distance (Original Acoustic Demo)
3:12
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13
Rene and George Magritte with Their Dog After the War (Original Acoustic Demo)
3:46
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14
The Late Great Johnny Ace (Original Acoustic Demo)
3:22
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 54:22

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

07.22.10
The Paul Simon New Wave Album!
2010 | Label: Legacy Recordings

Initially intended for a Simon & Garfunkel reunion album, it's probably a good thing these songs didn't have Artie on them — tracks like "Cars Are Cars," "Think Too Much (A)" and "When Numbers Get Serious" indicate that Paul had been paying attention to Talking Heads, or maybe the B-52's, who appeared in his 1980 movie One-Trick Pony. So yes, Hearts and Bones is the closest Simon ever came to making a "new wave" album,… read more »

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the best

tomdrum

This is Paul Simon's best album. Every song is beautiful, superbly crafted, complex and though-provoking without being difficult or overly-serious. It many ways it's a perfect companion for Graceland, in fact Graceland is really Hearts and Bones part 2, recycling many of the same melodies and themes.

user avatar

A real heartbreak!

wasit10538

This album is so sweet and so complex that it's a real heartbreak it didn't sell. I remember reading an interview in which Simon said that he didn't promote it well. Probably more to the point was that it was competing in the very rich year of 1983. What chance does a 25-year veteran stand against the likes of Police and Men At Work? If you fancy Graceland, you'll fancy this: just don't expect the same vibe.

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eMusic Features

3

Icon: Paul Simon

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

For a guy whose image is as set in stone as Paul Simon's - well-off Manhattanite liberal intellectual, on the depressive side, three times married - and considering how infrequently he releases new albums, he's traversed more musical ground than nearly every other American singer-songwriter. From the minute he broke it off with Art Garfunkel, Simon has sought out collaborators from all over the musical spectrum, and for a couple of decades he got great… more »

3

Icon: Paul Simon

By Michelangelo Matos, Contributor

For a guy whose image is as set in stone as Paul Simon's - well-off Manhattanite liberal intellectual, on the depressive side, three times married - and considering how infrequently he releases new albums, he's traversed more musical ground than nearly every other American singer-songwriter. From the minute he broke it off with Art Garfunkel, Simon has sought out collaborators from all over the musical spectrum, and for a couple of decades he got great… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Hearts and Bones was a commercial disaster, the lowest-charting new studio album of Paul Simon’s career. It is also his most personal collection of songs, one of his most ambitious, and one of his best. It retains a personal vision, one largely devoted to the challenges of middle-aged life, among them a renewed commitment to love; the title song was a notable testament to new romance, while “Train in the Distance” reflected on romantic discord. Elsewhere, “The Late Great Johnny Ace” was his meditation on John Lennon’s murder and how it related to the mythology of pop music. Musically, Simon moved forward and backward simultaneously, taking off from the jazz fusion style of his last two albums into his old loves of doo wop and rock & roll while also incorporating current sounds with such new collaborators as dance music producer Nile Rodgers and minimalist composer Philip Glass. The result was Simon’s most impressive collection in a decade and the most underrated album in his catalog. – William Ruhlmann

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