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Glass: Einstein On The Beach

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (34 ratings)
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Glass: Einstein On The Beach album cover
Disc 1 of 4
01
Knee Play 1
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
3:52
$0.49
$0.99
02
Act I. Scene I - Train
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
17:20
 
03
Scene II - Trail
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
23:20
 
Disc 2 of 4
01
Knee Play 2
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
6:50
$0.49
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02
Act II. Scene I - Dance 1 "Field with Spaceship"
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
13:41
 
03
Scene II - Night Train
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
13:52
 
04
Knee Play 3
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
5:39
$0.49
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Disc 3 of 4
01
Act III. Scene I - Trail/Prison
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
18:15
 
02
Scene II - Dance 2 "Field with Spaceship"
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
17:10
 
03
Knee Play 4
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
6:46
$0.49
$0.99
Disc 4 of 4
01
Act IV. Scene I - Building
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
7:30
$0.49
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02
Scene II - Bed
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
11:49
 
03
Scene III - Spaceship
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
13:23
 
04
Knee Play 5
Artist: Philip Glass Ensemble;Michael Reisman
5:30
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 164:57

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John Schaefer

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John Schaefer is the host of WNYC’s innovative music/talk show Soundcheck, which features live performances and interviews with a variety of guests. Schaefer ha...more »

06.30.09
One of the true revolutionary moments in music history
1985 | Label: Sony Classical

One of the true revolutionary moments in music history, the 1976 debut of Einstein sent shock waves through the worlds of classical music, and eventually rock music, and forced a complete re-thinking of what the word "opera" might mean. EOTB consisted of a dreamlike sequence of tableaux by avant-garde director Robert Wilson, often accompanied by a headlong rush of winds, keyboards and vocals from the Philip Glass Ensemble. The tension between the slow movements on… read more »

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Save $7. But still buy this

EMUSIC-00E2E520

The identical recording was re-released by Sony in early 2012 with a different cover and is available on eMusic for $15 as of September 2012. A funny note--the final knee play on this version ends in a really lovely way ("Impossible, you say?"), but that's an artifact of the size of the LP--the knee play and text goes on for another three minutes and ends in with a kiss, which I only discovered after seeing the revival last night in Brooklyn. I don't know if I'll ever get used to that.

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Glass + Wilson

EMUSIC-00E2E520

Really the only Phillip Glass I still listen to besides Music in 12 Parts. Less cloying than the later operas, and fresher than everything since. And yes, not as accessible as much later Glass (but more so than Music in 12 Parts).

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better than 1993 recording

mcwittmann

What a fabulous, groundbreaking album. It's almost worth it to write down what you're hearing, just to catch themes that show up again an hour or two into the piece. Fabulous energy, bizarrely captivating, and thoroughly meaningful music. It's worth the effort. I like this recording more than the 1993 version, which is softer, muddier, and not as energetic. This one thrives with a punk mentality. It's not perfect, consistent with the idea that people should just damn well take a breath when they need it. It's human. It's not lush. It's raw. It's perfect. I love it.

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What's after Glass?

richard.watson8

What's next after this album? What else can I listen to now that doesn't seem superficial and pale?

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Ridiculous! Throw Caution to the Wind

frankiepop

Download this masterpiece. Risk a little. Live a little. This music can change your life.

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Approach with Extreme Caution

mrothello

If you're familar with Philp Glass from his film scores or"Songs From Liquid Days",I don't think you're going to get into this work. I have the original LP and to this day, i can't listen to it all the way through. It's musical torture.I've tried to find a way into the music, but i just can't. Consider this a warning.

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Not Really Expensive

stevesmith2

At first, I too thought that 48 credits was too much, but checking out iTunes and several music sites, the cheapest price that I found was $39 for this recording. So 48 credits (or $24) is not really bad. Psychologically though, it hurts to spend that many credits on one recording.

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I'm quitting emusic.

BitchesBrew

48 credits?! I can buy the album for the cost of 48 credits. This is a total scam.

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A Marvel

ambientscott

Simply of the 2 or 3 best records on eMusic.

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48 credits??

picklepete

How is this supposed to work? It requires 48 credits to download the set, yet under the new pricing I'll only get 35 credits a month. I have to buy a booster pack just to get this? No thanks. (Didn't really mean to rate this, as my complaint is re. e-music, not the recording itself)

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They Say All Music Guide

This opera, composed in 1975 and premiered in 1976, is scored for four principal actors, 12 singers doubling as dancers and actors, a solo violinist, and an amplified ensemble of keyboards, winds and voices. It is imbued with the postmodern spirit both in its non-linear, poetic, mystic narrative and the floating, eternal world created by the shifting, mathematically precise patterns of Philip Glass’ modal music. There are three primary visual sets linked to three musical themes that recur within the work: trains (recalling the metaphors Einstein used to illustrate the theory of relativity, and with which he played as a child), a trial setting (modern life and modern science examined), and a spaceship (a metaphor for transcendence, and/or an escape from nuclear disaster). Also, Einstein himself appears midway between the orchestra and the stage as a violinist (his hobby) and as observer/witness. There are also additional spoken texts written by Christopher Knowles, Samuel M. Johnson and Lucinda Childs, which appear in various arrangements for single and multiple voices. This work locates itself as a midpoint between the composer’s early-’70s work, linking rhythmic and harmonic structures and his later series of operas and vocal works and film scores employing expanded narrative and/or timbral experiments. – “Blue” Gene Tyranny

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