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New Hope for the Wretched

Rate It! Avg: 3.5 (24 ratings)
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New Hope for the Wretched album cover
01
Tight Black Pants
1:47
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02
Monkey Suit
3:27
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03
Living Dead
1:34
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Test Tube Babies
1:54
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05
Won't You
2:29
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06
Concrete Shoes
2:56
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Squirm (Live)
3:29
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Want You Baby
1:56
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Dreamlover
5:43
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10
Sometimes I
3:58
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11
Corruption
2:40
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12
Butcher Baby
3:32
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13
Tight Black Pants (Live)
1:56
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14
Living Dead (Live)
3:52
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15
Sometimes I (Live)
3:55
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16
Lunacy
5:08
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17
Doom Song
5:22
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18
Sex Junke (Live)
3:08
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19
Black Leather Monster
3:41
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12 Noon
3:30
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21
Masterplan (Live)
4:48
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 21   Total Length: 70:45

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Classic Wendy O

MightyBoognish

Wendy O was unique. Sad she's gone. The spectacle was better than the music but not all the time...dig Squirm & Master Plan live. Disagree with rickstervc...Fridays was way funnier than the same era of SNL. Mainstays of Fridays were the Plasmatics, along with Devo & The Cars. The only 3 I remember seeing. I remember Wendy was gonna blow up a bus so they cut them and were banned. Outstanding!!

user avatar

Seminal

carridiva

I bought this on LP (pink vinyl) when I was about 14, and it's remained to be one of my most favorite records. All those dumb-ass teen queens who think they own their sexuality should give Wendy O a try!

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It Is What It Is

rickstervc

Back when I was 17 or so, I was watching the old ABC show, "Fridays," which was like "Saturday Night Live" but not as funny. I do remember many of the musical guests, and one of the most fascinating was Wendy O. Williams and the Plasmatics. When your 17, a butch blonde with huge breasts and electrical tape covering the nipples on TV is a fascinating sight. Most of these songs aren't worth downloading, but check out my personal favorite, "Sometimes I." The rest take at your peril.

They Say All Music Guide

This two-fer reissue from New York shock merchants the Plasmatics makes for a somewhat odd pairing, with the band’s most punk-friendly album, 1980′s New Hope for the Wretched, matched up with the 1981 EP Metal Priestess, where the band made its first clear bid for acceptance by the world’s heavy metal kids. Truth be told, the shift isn’t as disorienting as some might expect; a listen to New Hope makes it clear guitarists Richie Stotts and Wes Beech already had at least one toe dipped in the hard rock pool from the very beginning, though their more metallic inclinations were reigned in by the forward velocity of songs like “Tight Black Pants,” “Butcher Baby,” and “Monkey Suit,” as well as the noisy experimentalism of their cover of Bobby Darin’s “Dream Lover.” On Metal Priestess, however, the band embraced a more arena-friendly sound, and seem quite comfortable with the creative shift; while “Doom Song” and “Lunacy” are slower and more histrionic than the material on New Hope, “Black Leather Monster” and live-in-concert covers of “Masterplan” and “Sex Junkie” from Beyond the Valley of 1984 show the band could still do fast ‘n’ loud while trading gloom and doom for their more Dead Boys-esque approach. And while Stotts and Beech play metal with real authority, it’s singer Wendy O. Williams who really rises to the occasion, delivering the goods with greater skill than ever before. For this CD issue, New Hope for the Wretched has been tagged with three live bonus tracks, which (like the live stuff on Metal Priestess) feature a suspiciously enthusiastic audience who often seem louder than the band; while the EP would have better matched with Beyond the Valley of 1984, anyone nostalgic for mohawk-topped anarchists with a Black Sabbath jones will like this just fine. – Mark Deming

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