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Something Magic

Rate It! Avg: 3.5 (7 ratings)
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Something Magic album cover
01
Something Magic
3:37
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02
Skating On Thin Ice
4:50
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03
Wizard Man
2:42
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04
The Mark Of The Claw
4:40
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05
Strangers In Space
6:08
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06
The Worm & The Tree, Part 1: Introduction - Menace - Occupation
7:50
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07
The Worm & The Tree, Part 2: Enervation - Expectancy - Battle
5:29
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08
The Worm & The Tree, Part 3: Regeneration - Epilogue
5:28
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09
Backgammon
3:25
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10
You'd Better Wait (Live in the studio)
4:47
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11
This Old Dog (Live in the studio)
3:42
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 52:38

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Love it!

Melodyman50

I TOTALLY disagree with many reviews that call this a weak album. I think it has the usual class, innovation and quality of all their other albums and YES, I love the Worm and the Tree segment. Very nice. Something MAGIC it is!

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Yes... Memories Indeed

MusicLab

I remember Procol playing out on our quadrangle at Lafayette College in Spring 1977 and this album had just come out. Sounded pretty good back then. OK, so its not the best PH album on your shelf. But "Something Magic," "Mark of the Claw," and the eerie "Strangers in Space" worth the downloads.

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ahh,memories

chip791

I remember when this came out. WNEW in New York used to play it at night.its a good prog album

They Say All Music Guide

Even fans call this one “Something Tragic.” There are still hints of the tight ensemble playing that characterizes the best of Procol’s Chrysalis albums, but most of the first side is dreary, uninspired stuff. While the title track captures some of the drama of early Procol, Brooker’s distinctive voice is the sole link to their former glory on indifferent cuts like “Wizard Man.” (“Strangers in Space” later appeared on the Brooker-produced The Long Good-bye: The Symphonic Music of Procol Harum.) “The Worm & The Tree” is a side-long extravagance, the first time the band had produced a work of this length since “In Held ‘Twas I,” on the 1968 release, Shine on Brightly. Unlike the whimsy and charm of that earlier suite, though, “The Worm & The Tree” lyrically evokes Emerson, Lake & Palmer’s at their most tedious (Tarkus). Seemingly out of steam, and out of step with the rising tide of punk music, Procol Harum packed it in, not to return until the ’90s. – James A. Gardner

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