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Rage Against The Machine

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (615 ratings)
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Rage Against The Machine album cover
01
Bombtrack
4:04
$0.79
$1.29
02
Killing In The Name
5:13
$0.79
$1.29
03
Take The Power Back
5:36
$0.69
$0.99
04
Settle For Nothing
4:47
$0.69
$0.99
05
Bullet In The Head
5:08
$0.49
$0.99
06
Know Your Enemy
4:55
$0.79
$1.29
07
Wake Up
6:04
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$1.29
08
Fistful Of Steel
5:31
$0.69
$0.99
09
Township Rebellion
5:24
$0.69
$0.99
10
Freedom
6:06
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Album Information
EXPLICIT // EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 52:48

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

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Jess Harvell

Contributor

06.30.09
Shameless agitprop still packs a potent, bratty punch
1992 | Label: Epic

Though their music and their politics would grow more effective as they grew more nuanced, Rage Against the Machine's self-titled 1992 debut still packs a certain bratty rush. That gleefully inchoate — and occasionally just plain boneheaded — rebellious streak is best captured by the utterly shameless, profanity-heavy, eighth-grade-level agit-prop delivered at the end of "Killing in the Name." A beyond-blunt kiss-off to any and all authority figures, it remains Rage's most iconic nine-word statement,… read more »

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Great & In Your Face!!!

evilshaw

RATM is one of the best band of the 90's & the music holds up well over time!!! This albums power & spirt are as strong today as they were when it was released!!!

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Anarchy - big government style

KfuMike

Please learn what archarchy means and dig deeper into what Rage Against the machine advocates - it sure as hell ain't Anarchy.

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Anarchy At It's Best!

gabellerebel63

Beastie Boys, move aside! All white rappers pale in comparision to these bad boys of rock/hip-hop! The track Killing In The Name particularly holds true to their violent, anarchistic nature of previous albums, and one of the best ones I've heard recently. Rage is the Rave, baby!

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Never Gets Old

Jalal

Timeless

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Essential

BonsaiSamurai

This album always gets my blood boiling. The right sound, the right time (yet timeless in tone and spirit).

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From my high school days...

tennisloser

...when I was angry and didn't even know why. This is (in my humble opinion) Rage's best album. The next couple albums had the feel and the attitude. But this one, well it had the rage in all it's glory. Know Your Enemy was my introduction to RATM, it is still a song that gets me in the gut. This entire album is raw and filled with exactly what you would expect. Rage.

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Not available in Mexico

ataqueeg

Well, Mininova it is, then!

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Angry ... And That's OK

BuckySinister

A great collection of angry young man music, and a great rock album. I must admit, though, that I find the E-Music review a little elitist. Isn't that poorly-focused rage, that insanely righteous anger, the whole point here? Sure it's a bit adolescent. But... It's rock & roll. Adolescent is OK. So lighten up, grandad!

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eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Rage Against the Machine

By Wondering Sound Staff, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Rage Against the Machine

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They Say All Music Guide

Probably the first album to successfully merge the seemingly disparate sounds of rap and heavy metal, Rage Against the Machine’s self-titled debut was groundbreaking enough when released in 1992, but many would argue that it has yet to be surpassed in terms of influence and sheer brilliance — though countless bands have certainly tried. This is probably because the uniquely combustible creative relationship between guitar wizard Tom Morello and literate rebel vocalist Zack de la Rocha could only burn this bright, this once. While the former’s roots in ’80s heavy metal shredding gave rise to an inimitable array of six-string acrobatics and rhythmic special effects (few of which anyone else has managed to replicate), the latter delivered meaningful rhymes with an emotionally charged conviction that suburban white boys of the ensuing nu-metal generation could never hope to touch. As a result, syncopated slabs of hard rock insurrection like “Bombtrack,” “Take the Power Back,” and “Know Your Enemy” were as instantly unforgettable as they were astonishing. Yet even they paled in comparison to veritable clinics in the art of slowly mounting tension such as “Settle for Nothing,” “Bullet in the Head,” and the particularly venomous “Wake Up” (where Morello revises Led Zeppelin’s “Kashmir” riff for his own needs) — all of which finally exploded with awesome power and fury. And even listeners who were unable (or unwilling) to fully process the band’s unique clash of muscle and intellect were catered to, as RATM were able to convey their messages through stubborn repetition via the fundamental challenge of “Freedom” and their signature track, “Killing in the Name,” which would become a rallying cry of disenfranchisement, thanks to its relentlessly rebellious mantra of “Fuck you, I won’t do what you tell me!” Ultimately, if there’s any disappointment to be had with this near-perfect album, it’s that it still towers above subsequent efforts as the unequivocal climax of Rage Against the Machine’s vision. As such, it remains absolutely essential. – Eduardo Rivadavia

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