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Barbarians

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (12 ratings)
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Barbarians album cover
01
Coldest Day
3:37
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02
Palo Alto
4:53
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03
Stars
3:10
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04
Great Republic
3:29
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05
Kiss Off
1:32
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06
May
3:17
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07
Amsterdam
2:32
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08
Kissinger's Banjo
2:57
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09
FOG
3:20
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10
Formulas
4:44
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 33:31

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persevere

savoygrand

As a big fan of Richard Davies and Cardinal i initally felt like the reviewer below, but this album really is a grower. This record has a much looser and less studied feel than Davies earlier works, and he seems much more impassioned and honest. No, it's not as immediately stunning as "theres never been a crowd..." but its well worth getting. Its beautifully recorded as well. Where is he now!?

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nice but

J'Adorno

Sadly, this is the least compelling of Richard Davies' body of work. He takes the roots-ish rock of the last album a bit further on Barbarians, which never made a positive impact on me. Instead, hunt out his work with Eric Matthews as Cardinal, his two previous solo albums (on Flydaddy), or even his early work as the Moles.

They Say All Music Guide

Richard Davies’ third solo effort is the most straightforward guitar-pop record he’s produced to date — stripped of the orchestral flourishes of his early work, as well as the psych-folk textures of the previous Telegraph, Barbarians instead favors a simple yet nuanced approach which nevertheless cuts a wide stylistic path spanning from dark, ominous garage-rock (“Great Republic”) to feather-light acoustic balladry (the gorgeous “Stars”). From the Uncle Sam stars-and-stripes stovepipe hat which adorns the cover to name-checks of everything from the Rio Grande to Lewis & Clark to NASA, Barbarians is a pointed, if often abstract, meditation on Davies’ adopted home of America — many of the songs touch on themes of exploration and migration, yet despite his obvious gifts for rich, poetic wordplay, the lyrics don’t really add up to much when taken as a whole. Still, given time, Davies’ lazily ingratiating melodies take hold, and the record’s relaxed, spontaneous atmosphere evokes a nonchalance ideally suited to its understated ambitions. – Jason Ankeny

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