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Revolutions Per Minute

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (136 ratings)
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Revolutions Per Minute album cover
01
Black Masks & Gasoline
2:59
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02
Heaven Knows
3:23
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03
Dead Ringer
1:31
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04
Halfway There
3:41
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05
Like The Angel
2:46
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06
Voices Off Camera
2:16
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07
Blood-Red White & Blue
3:39
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08
Broken English
3:25
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09
Last Chance Blueprint
2:14
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10
To The Core
1:33
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11
Torches
3:41
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12
Amber Changing
3:38
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 34:46

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Addictive

HMarsh

When I was fifteen I stumbled across this band and got my first taste of punk music beyond the burned CD discretely slipped to me by cousin at a family reunion. I was hooked. It's almost a decade later and they have maintained the fire, passion and humanity in their music that first drew me in. Just listen as Tim McIlrath jumps from smooth melodies to screaming and then flawlessly slides into calm reasoning with the listener or as bassist, Joe Principe and drummer, Brandon Bames, both prove their skill in this album, combining skill, talent and the raw emotion that characterizes the genre and I'm sure you'll find something you like. Personally, I love that this band appears to actually have the convictions they sing about. Rather than Rise Against simply whining on stage about things they don't like, this band actually attempts to enact change through a number of political and social movements. Actual integrity in this modern age is appreciated and respected.

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I Love this band!

liz_c135

This album, like all their others, ROCKS.

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Top notch

alexashton

This is far and away Rise Against's most solid album from start to finish, and one of the best overall punk albums from the modern era. More recent efforts, while all worthwhile, just don't touch the level of intensity, emotion and anger found here.

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One of my favorite punk albums

whitetrashpuppetshow

RPM is Rise Against's strongest Fat Wreck Chords release and was a prelude of things to come in their first two major label releases, showcasing their ability to blend straightforward punk, melodic hardcore, and metal influences into a hard-hitting songwriting style that exceeds the sum of its parts. Those that are already fans know what I mean. Those who aren't should check out the earlier efforts of one of the best bands to recently hit commercial radio, at least until their most recent album. Highly recommended.

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Best Rise Against album by a longshot

MulletLover

Though Rise Against has been reliable to release album after album of quality music without straying too far from the sound they do well, revolutions per minute is a standout and stand alone album. Not every song on it is good, but I don't mind the attempts to change it up if it doesn't work, because for the songs that do work, they are leagues above songs on the following albums. The aggression and desire to make a name for themselves is felt in these songs, both lyrically and in the stripped down raw rock of these songs. Nothing can replace that fire that bands have when they want to make it! More polished than their debut album, and a must have if you like Rise Against.

They Say All Music Guide

With clenched fists in the air, boots to the floor, and anger swelling in their chests, the members of Rise Against return with their second album, Revolutions Per Minute. It’s a two-pronged attack. From the north blows the fury of their hearts, swept up as they are in their passion for a girl who is “Like the Angel,” but love that strong almost inevitably eventually engenders the opposite emotions — and so it is with Rise. And even as they beg on “Amber Changing” to pretend that tonight will never end, the relationship sours, and even their “Last Chance Blueprint fails to change the emotional landscape, leaving nothing but hatred it its wake, reaching a paroxysm of viciousness on “To the Core,” a ferocious, fever-pitched number written and delivered with pure vitriol. If that’s the bitter northern wind, bringing with it blizzards of wintry emotions warmed only by the heat of anger boiling in their hearts, the gale from the south comes as no relief. This, to continue the metaphor, is the wind of political change that descended with hurricane force on 9/11 and left all of us, Rise included, reeling in its wake. Across the rest of Revolutions, the bandmembers scan the wasteland around them and see people running for cover, desperate to find a shred of security again. But as “Blood-Red, White & Blue” makes clear, safety is an illusion, and our bomb-laden reply futile. “Would God bless a murder of the innocents?…a war based on pride?…a money-hungry government? No.” Desperate for a real leader, we are left with the blind leading the blind, where “every problem is solved with a fight.” “Is this the point where we give up?…give in?…turn ourselves in?” they demand to know on “Halfway There.” Railing against a government bent on revenge and friends blinded to reality, the band cries out for a revolution with “Black Masks & Gasoline.” Like all Revolutions, this is an album filled with anguish — spiritual, emotional, and political — a roar against the tide of history washing over us, echoed by the wrenching pain of love lost. The music is as impassioned as the lyrics, rubbing emotions raw and minds numb. – Jo-Ann Greene

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