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Since We Last Spoke

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (218 ratings)
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Since We Last Spoke album cover
01
Since We Last Spoke
4:14
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02
Exotic Talk
3:43
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03
1976
2:27
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04
Ring Finger
3:47
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05
Making Days Longer
4:36
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06
Someone's Second Kiss
4:28
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07
To All Of You
5:09
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08
Clean Living
4:29
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09
Iced Lightning
4:06
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10
Intro
1:10
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11
Through The Walls
3:27
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12
One Day
4:50
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 46:26

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Write a Review 7 Member Reviews

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Hometown heroes

MazedCraniac

Nice to hear some good beats frome down the street.

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fly beats

spiffylike

By far my favourite RJD2 release, simply for Clean Living and 1976. If you were to get one other RJD2, I'd recommend Deadringer also. This guy is so talented, I love the layers of rhythm, instrumentals, and voice that build upon eath other to create great 'walking down the street' music and maybe doing a little groove at the bus-stop.

user avatar

Awesome

Granada

Really inspiring, totally entacing. A real fresh surprise...where have you guys been all these years?

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Infectious

Halien

Like a lot of RJD2 stuff, this album benefits greatly from repeat listens (headphones!). There's so much going on here that I'm still finding new things to like after months listening to it. That being said he has a very strong, unapologetic style that you're either going to love or hate.

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Besting the sophmore slump!

CotchMckroklin

Since we last spoke smoked me right in the jaw with its "I'm a second record and here I am kicking your ass" attitude. RJD2 comes at us with ankle breaking funk, meloncholia from all dimensions and soothing lazerbeam ballads on Since We Last Spoke. "Through the Walls" sounds like Rick Sprinfield and Brian Eno collaborated and made a techno 80's power ballad. The courage involved in this sophomore effort was more than present and it delivers immensely. The subtle development in RJD2's song structure leads to dramatic climaxes, yet not making to bold of a statement. A nicely blended concoction of samples from God knows where with a hip hop base creates a recipe for all to try. Yummy!

user avatar

simply a great records

NYZE

if you're choosing on only track, just check "1976" - but really, this whole album is noteworthy.

eMusic Features

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Looking Past Hip-Hop: RJD2 and Nobody

By Hua Hsu, Contributor

One night a few years ago I was zipping through the traffic maze of Los Angeles, on my way to meet the producer Nobody on the occasion of his just-released debut album, Soulmates. He had given me very vague directions, and so the signal strength of KXLU, where he was doing his weekly radio show, helped guide my path. As the static cleared, I grew more confused: what was he playing? Rather than the Project… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Instrumental hip-hop can be a tough way to succeed, financially or artistically. The commercial world puts a low price on non-superstar productions and, for independent rap, the specter of DJ Shadow towers over all who come after him. Though it was overhyped, the full debut of Rjd2 in 2002 (Dead Ringer) illustrated there was additional ground left to plow. Unlike the dozens of Shadow imitators, Rjd2 isn’t simply a resurrector of unjustly forgotten wax. He’s a virtuoso on the sampler who recognizes that what’s important isn’t the beats, but what you do with them. To that he adds an implicit awareness of how to pace the songs on his albums for maximum effect. (It certainly doesn’t hurt that, around that time, late-’70s rock and urban, his favorite genres to mine for samples, were closer to becoming cool than they had ever been before.) None of these traits were forgotten during Rjd2′s journey to success, and his second production album refines the approach still further. With only a few exceptions, though, Since We Last Spoke makes the moody Dead Ringer sound like a piece of flag-waving exuberance; instead of the occasional up-tempo track, it’s brooding and mellow throughout the record — very nearly a rap singer/songwriter record. Three tracks in a row (“Exotic Talk,” “1976,” “Ring Finger”) are sludge rock jams with just a few beats cut out and a few extras (like a talkbox or horn section) pasted on. Surely 50 Cent has nothing to worry about, but Rjd2 knows what he’s doing and all of these songs have a way of worming inside your head until you can’t wait for the next one. You’ve got to hand it to any producer who’s able to succeed despite covering (and contributing the vocals for) one of the more mawkish tunes of Labi Siffre (who’s revered by hip-hop artists for creating the classic “My Name Is…” and “Streets Is Watching” riffs, but who also functioned as a gay Al Stewart during the ’70s). It’s a left turn for one of the most promising producers in alt-rap, but it could lead to a better place down the road. – John Bush

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