|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Thora Vukk

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (40 ratings)
Retail
Member
Thora Vukk album cover
01
Wupp Dek
6:22
$0.49
$0.99
02
Thora Vukk
6:45
$0.49
$0.99
03
Brücke Eins
1:39
$0.49
$0.99
04
Bommsen Böff
6:30
$0.49
$0.99
05
Brücke Zwei
1:30
$0.49
$0.99
06
Pnom Gobal
5:18
$0.49
$0.99
07
Brücke Drei
1:27
$0.49
$0.99
08
Tulpa Ovi
4:35
$0.49
$0.99
09
Brücke Vier
1:55
$0.49
$0.99
10
Prognosen Bomm
3:36
$0.49
$0.99
11
Brücke Fünf
1:58
$0.49
$0.99
12
Ende
5:05
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 46:40

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 2 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Really good

cjashwell

Satisfying and complete, yet minimal and crisp.

user avatar

brilliant

hvdv01

Reminds me of the Art of Noise. Intimate. versatile and gratyfying

eMusic Features

0

Six Degrees of Apparat’s The Devil’s Walk

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Apparat’s The Devil’s Walk

By Andy Beta, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

They Say All Music Guide

With the crisp, tense crackle of static, ominous whirs and clicks, beats that move from skittering pulse to full-on stomp, quiet moments of singing, and tender moaning tones, “Wupp Dek” starts Robag Wruhme’s 2011 album with panache and beauty. The continuing evolution of minimal-tinge electronic dance music lying somewhere between head space and dancefloor has a lovely expression here; if the general sound recurs throughout the disc, as on “Bromsen Boff” and “Tulpa Ovi,” it’s always to wonderful, immediately engaging effect. The general construction of central rhythms and core melodic loops as slightly reserved, elegant composition — sometimes by strings, sometimes by tones, sometimes seemingly just by the sculpting of ambient space — finds itself contrasting against the various found-sound moments that Wruhme compiled and used throughout. The result ranges from big, deep beats on “Pnom Gobal” to the blend of gentle piano and swift pulses on “Prognosen Bomm” The shorter interstitial pieces like “Brucke Vier” and its deep bottomless feeling add even more scope to such a seemingly low-key, personal album, while the snippets of children’s voices on the appropriately titled “Ende” at the disc’s conclusion add a bright, playful feeling in further and final contrast. – Ned Raggett

more »