|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Black Snake Diamond Role

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (99 ratings)
Retail
Member
Black Snake Diamond Role album cover
01
The Man Who Invented Himself
2:59
$0.69
$0.99
02
Brenda's Iron Sledge
2:56
$0.69
$0.99
03
Do Policemen Sing?
3:37
$0.69
$0.99
04
The Lizard
5:03
$0.69
$0.99
05
Meat
3:04
$0.49
$0.99
06
Acid Bird
4:42
$0.69
$0.99
07
I Watch The Cars
2:26
$0.69
$0.99
08
Out Of The Picture
3:41
$0.69
$0.99
09
City Of Shame
3:23
$0.49
$0.99
10
Love
4:45
$0.69
$0.99
11
All I Wanna Do Is Fall In Love
3:48
$0.69
$0.99
12
A Skull, A Suitcase & A Long Red Bottle Of Wine
4:59
$0.69
$0.99
13
It Was The Night
3:36
$0.69
$0.99
14
I Watch The Cars No. 2
4:26
$0.49
$0.99
15
Give Me A Spanner Ralph
2:38
$0.69
$0.99
16
It's A Mystic Trip
2:58
$0.69
$0.99
17
Grooving On A Inner Plane
4:12
$0.69
$0.99
18
Happy The Golden Prince
6:40
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information

Total Tracks: 18   Total Length: 69:53

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 7 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Black Snake Diamond Role

zero

Something is seriously wrong with production here. This sounds as if someone recorded that live without any mixing. Too bad, cause this indeed is a good album.

user avatar

Early, good Hitchcock

EMUSIC-00B90163

This has a number of good songs, especially "Brenda's Iron Sledge," and for Hitchcock comedy, there's "Do Policemen Sing?" But something happened to the horns on the first track -- by I which I mean they're missing. Otherwise, fine.

user avatar

Quintessential

secretchimp

Saying this isn't one of his better efforts is like saying Hendrix didn't have much to say on his first Lp. Download this and then go DL The Soft Boys' "Underwater Moonlight".

user avatar

I want my crown

CioranSellars

I personally think Robyn petered out after "I Often Dream of Trains", and this is one of his gems, however flawed. Yes the production is a bit rickety but that's part of it's charm and the lysergic undercurrent to this record is worth digging for (beyond the obvious Acid Bird). Bonus points for deciphering Lizard King...

user avatar

Are you freaking kidding me???

EMUSIC-001406E5

I know Robyn Hitchcock fans have their own particular tastes, but this is one of the all-time great pop rock albums by ANYONE, not just Robyn. Not to mention, I paid like 25 bucks for a copy of the original CD on ebay (most go for 35!), because I wanted it on my ipod and it's been completely unavailable for YEARS! This is a HUGE addition to emusic. For God's sake, download it! (Please note-- everything after "Love" are "bonus tracks" not on the original album. I haven't listened to them yet and so can't vouch for them. I'm generally not a big fan of bonus tracks being added to albums. You could always just not download them, I suppose.

user avatar

not crazy about this one

Drooch

I've had this album for over 20 years, but never considered it one of his better ones. When it popped up here I decided to pull out my old vinyl copy and reassess it. Frankly, I find it still doesn't measure up to his better efforts. Some of the songwriting is okay, much of it is second-tier Hitchcock. But the album's real weakness is the production and arrangements; they're just not very pleasing to the ear. It sounds more like unfinished demos that don't really gel. Overall maybe the weakest Hitchcock album in my collection. The last three bonus tracks are intriguing oddities, though.

user avatar

Great album - buy it

001FC116

This, as well as Eye and I Often Dream of Trains are truly great - they're also streamed free on the Yep Rock site and cost only $12.00 there - cheaper than downloading I believe.

eMusic Features

0

Y Robyn Hitchcock Matters

By Douglas Wolk, Contributor

I don't know if the Y in Robyn Hitchcock's name was there on his birth certificate, but I can't imagine it spelled "Robin." That Y is the same slightly odd Y that's present in the Byrds, in Syd Barrett and in Bob Dylan - arguably the three biggest historical presences behind his music. He's got an enormous, three-decade-long discography, but the early solo albums that have just come to eMusic include some of the sweetest… more »

They Say All Music Guide

The Soft Boys’ fusion of the energy of punk and the baroque textures and melodic twists of psychedelia was ahead of its time, but for the group’s leader, Robyn Hitchcock, that had become a problem. Brilliant as their music was, hardly anyone was listening when the Soft Boys released their masterpiece, Underwater Moonlight, in 1980 — so a year later the band was history and Hitchcock released his first solo album, Black Snake Diamond Role. While the other three members of the Soft Boys appeared on the album (guitarist Kimberley Rew, bassist Matthew Seligman, and drummer Morris Windsor) along with Vince Ely of the Psychedelic Furs, Knox from the Vibrators, and a then-unknown Thomas Dolby, Black Snake Diamond Role represented a subtle but clear shift away from the more aggressive tone of the Soft Boys toward a more pop-oriented sound. “The Man Who Invented Himself” is user-friendly in a way the Soft Boys had never been, and the production, while mostly straightforward, is more polished and professional. Even though the surfaces of this album are more welcoming than the Soft Boys, the surrealism of the lyrics and the trippy undertow of the melodies are in the same league as Hitchcock’s earlier work, and while “Acid Bird,” “Out of the Picture,” and “Brenda’s Iron Sledge” are newly catchy and engaging, the guitar work on “I Watch the Cars” shows Hitchcock’s vision had changed very little, and the menace of “Do Policemen Sing?” is only slightly undercut by its wit. Black Snake Diamond Role staked out a distinct sonic territory for Hitchcock’s solo career that still made room for the abundant talent he’d displayed in his years with the Soft Boys, and remains one of his most enjoyable efforts. – Mark Deming

more »