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LINDBERG, M.: Graffiti / Seht die Sonne

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LINDBERG, M.: Graffiti / Seht die Sonne album cover
01
Graffiti: Beginning
4:13
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02
Graffiti: Bar 111
4:17
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03
Graffiti: Bar 232
6:14
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04
Graffiti: Bar 403
4:42
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05
Graffiti: Bar 518
6:28
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Graffiti: Bar 682
5:47
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07
Seht die Sonne: I. —
12:17
 
08
Seht die Sonne: II. —
7:41
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Seht die Sonne: III. —
5:40
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 9   Total Length: 57:19

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New and find from Lindberg

gtra1n

A fine new release from Lindberg. His music has always been rugged, and this is, but the CD seems to mark a move to a more transparent, tonal more accessible idiom. It’s uncompromising in its harmonic complexity and challenging sonic quality and still immediately attractive to the ear. The use of chorus is new and excellent. The graffiti from ancient Pompeii is set expressively; grand, raucous, funny, wistful and vulgar. At the end GRAFFITI trails off into a captivating sense of pending doom. It’s full of energy and color, made with intelligence, imagination and an ear for good sounds. This is truer for Seht die Sonne, a symphony in three parts. It has a Romatic sweep to it, frequently working it's way out of churning depths into resonant light. There's dramatic motion, and it’s exciting. Excellent playing and recording. Lindberg may be summing up all he's done before and moving into new territory, and the promise of this CD is one of the most exciting things about it.

eMusic Features

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Magnus Lindberg

By Jayson Greene, Senior Editor

The esteemed Finnish composer Magnus Lindberg has traveled a long, itinerant path to his current post as composer-in-residence for the New York Philharmonic. After finishing his classical studies in the early 1980s, he found his attentions snagged by Japanese drumming and punk rock. He dabbled in musique concréte, added scrap-metal percussion and spoken-word to his orchestral works, and generally followed his wayward muse wherever it led him. If these disparate influences weren't always immediately detectable… more »