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I See The Sign

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (129 ratings)
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I See The Sign album cover
01
How Come That Blood
3:28
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02
Way Go Lily
4:15
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03
You Better Mind
3:43
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04
I See The Sign
6:12
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05
Johanna The Row-di
2:22
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06
Pretty Fair Damsel
3:04
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07
Kedron
2:55
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08
Rain And Snow
3:51
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09
Climbing High Mountains
3:05
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10
Relief
5:22
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11
Red
3:42
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 41:59

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Write a Review 6 Member Reviews

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Only good music...

mswendysmith

Years ago I played something for a very good friend of mine who has impeccable taste in music (at least to my mind). I asked him what he thought of what I played and he said “I only like good music.” You’d have to know this guy to know that he wasn’t being snobby. In his case it’s really true. When I’m listening to something new trying to decide if it’s download worthy I imagine if he’d think that this was “good music”. It’s a high standard and the reason I’ve rambled on about all this (this is my first time reviewing) is that this album is “good.” It’s unique, the lyrics are very well written and his delivery is brillient.

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This grew on me

fulofunk

He is quirky in how he vocalizes things, but it works backed by some very cool folk/electro music.

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I would say more Adem than Nick

yak

I was turned on to his work by listening to BBC's late junction and immediately just fell in love with his music. It has this wonderful old time "gospel in a small church in the Great Smokey Mountains" folk feel, with scratchy banjo and off kilter vocals. His albums are real uplifters for the heart. Although I see the comparison with Nick Drakes work, Sam's music (while being beautiful in its own right) has a whole different Americana feel to it. It has a rougher edge but has soulfulness, and glorius creativity very much like Irelands Adem.

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one of the best out there

meewa

we can do better than another nick drake comparison. sam amidon mines the fertile grounds of american folk music and reinvents these traditional songs with the help of one of the worlds greatest music collectives out there, the 'bedroom community'. the results are accomplished, surprising, and soulful. oh yeah, and Beth Orton!

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Place To Be...

wattsup

Evil2win got it right in mentioning Nick Drake. Unlike some musicians who try to hard and end up sounding like a poor facsimile, Sam has taken the feel and atmosphere from Drake's records to create something very much his own. Fantastic.

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Way Too Blue

Evil2win

Not really ... I just wanted to make a clever Nick Drake connection ... who, while strolling down the lonely indie-folk highway, bumped into Damien Jurado along the way. They hung out for a while and came up with a fairly engrossing album.

They Say All Music Guide

This is the third set of interpretations of (primarily) traditional, public domain material from multivalent modern folk artist Sam Amidon. Like its predecessor, 2007′s All Is Well, it was recorded in Iceland with producer Valgeir Sigurðsson and features the subtle, masterful orchestral arrangements of Nico Muhly; key contributions also come from drummer/percussionist Shahzad Ismaily and from Beth Orton, who sings alongside Amidon on four songs. Each of these collaborators adds to the album’s rich, expansive, textural palette, allowing considerable psychological range within its generously subdued tone, from the urgency of opening murder ballad “How Come That Blood” (with Ismaily’s tense, churning percussion and pointed mini-Moog jabs) to the lush, billowing sweetness of “Pretty Fair Damsel” (Muhly’s florid celeste and woodwind figures), and the fluid tranquility of “Climbing High Mountains” (a restful treatment that tempers the song’s world-weary lyric.) But always at the forefront are Amidon’s voice –which recalls Will Oldham in its restraint and slight rustic roughness — and, especially, the songs he has chosen to make his own. These include several tunes from the Georgia Sea Islands, learned (via Amidon’s folksinging parents) from the powerful renditions of Bessie Jones, and sung in duet with Orton: the “singing-game” “Johanna the Row-Di” and “Way Go, Lily” (refashioned from a peppy handclapping jingle into a gently yearning ballad), and the admonishing folk-gospel number “You Better Mind,” given a fervent, rousing reading and a vigorous arrangement that’s at once stately and spirited. Christian themes (and apocalyptic imagery) crop up elsewhere, notably on the spare, somberly portentous title track and the simply sung lament “Kedron,” but even the selections that aren’t explicitly religious are treated with a gospel-like solemnity and directness of feeling. Muhly’s playfully inventive arrangements work marvelously throughout to complement this seriousness with a delicate balance of levity, but the album’s most lighthearted (and unexpected) moment is also perhaps its most spiritual: “Relief,” a simple, deeply felt paean to the persevering goodness of life, might appear in this context like an old-time folk number — after all, what kind of knucklehead would pen a line like “what a relief to know that the war is over” in days like these? — but in fact it’s by R. Kelly, salvaged from the unreleased 2008 fiasco 12 Play: 4th Quarter. And it’s stunningly gorgeous; further confirmation, if any were needed, that Amidon’s instincts and talents as a musical conservationist, interpreter, and reanimator are to be wholly trusted and cherished. – K. Ross Hoffman

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