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Seu Jorge and Almaz

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (135 ratings)
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Seu Jorge and Almaz album cover
01
Errare Humanum Est
4:52
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02
The Model
3:09
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03
Cristina
3:10
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04
Saudosa Bahia
3:18
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05
Cirandar
4:16
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06
Tempo De Amor
3:24
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07
Everybody Loves The Sunshine
4:57
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08
Pai Joao
3:53
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09
Rock With You
4:17
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10
Cala Boca, Menino
2:21
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11
Girl You Move Me
5:32
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12
Juizo Final
4:52
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 48:01

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Andy Beta

Contributor

Andy Beta has written about music and comedy for the Wall Street Journal, the disco revival for the Village Voice, animatronic bands for SPIN, Thai pop for the

07.26.10
Seu Jorge and Almaz, Seu Jorge and Almaz
Label: Now Again Records

While Brazilian samba revivalist Seu Jorge had already released two expertly crafted albums by 2004, it was only when Wes Anderson's camera zoomed in on the singer-songwriter perched on the prow of the Belafonte in The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou that many westerners took notice. Jorge's deft interpretations of David Bowie classics like "Life on Mars" and "Space Oddity" into his native tongue for the soundtrack were revelatory, as nifty an equator-crossing reinterpretation… read more »

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Easily seduced

Padger

We English speaking people have always been easily seduced by the lush sound of the sung Portuguese language. But behind the Brazilian reverie there needs to be some substance. Having been alerted to this album by some great sounding live tracks made at the BBC, I found this album a real disappointment. It's when I heard the rather lame versions of English language songs that I realized that it was the cool sound of Portuguese that had been hooking me in all the time. It's a pity; I'd been looking forward to it.

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Relax Your Mind, Lay Back and Groove with Mine

edmaury

Smooth rhythms, hollowed drums and Seu's gruff voices lays down a texture that grows on you after a few listens. I was only interested in his Roy Ayers and Michael Jackson covers but found myself liking tracks 1,3.5, and 11. Give it a try.

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Seu Jorge and Almaz

caribbeandebbie

Not familiar with this band, but I like Latin/Brazil music. This sounded "haunting" to me. A little too gloomy for my taste. But a couple of tracks - "Rock with You" being one had a good sound & I will probably download it at a later time.

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Awesome show at Firestone

Imagewerks17

Go to the live show and support these legends. The record is good. But live these guys freaking rocked the house. I can some what agree with the review from Maui, they could have twisted it and rearranged things differently. But if you pay close attention to the record sleeve, it was recorded in a week. But give the album a few tries and take it for what it is. There are some awesome musicians on here. Check out the live show and you will be hunting down the vinyl like I did. Paz e abracos

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I was hoping for more.

djelgatohawaii.com

This is good, but I had higher expectations. The reverby guitar is awesome, but not enough to carry a whole album. There is no samba sound on here. A samba percussion/reverby guitar combo would have been a very cool experiment. His singing and lyrics just don't come through. "Rock With You" is a cool cover and worth a download, but if he had sung it in Portuguese it would have been a lot cooler. The way he covered the Bowie tracks on Steve Zizu is epic and gave a new twist to classic songs. Portuguese just sounds so wonderful - stick with it! When Brazilians sing in English it lacks a lot. Regardless, tracks 4 & 9 are worth it and I'm sure their tour is worth the price. I wrote this before listening to it well enough. Unfortunately, it is worse than I thought. His singing and lyrics are just bad. I hope they liven it up "ao vivo."

They Say All Music Guide

By 2010, the name Seu Jorge was known to those besides Brazilian music cognoscenti, thanks mainly to his role in Wes Anderson’s Life Aquatic, in which he sang covers, in Portuguese, of classic David Bowie songs. And Jorge also performs covers here with his band Almaz, on the self-titled record released by funk and soul stalwarts Now-Again. This is surely not coincidental: interpreting other artists’ work, in fact, may be what Jorge is best suited for. His voice, nuanced and capable, is a powerful instrument — as adept at moving lightly and gently (like in the very Caetano Veloso-esque take of the rather obscure “Saudosa Bahia” by Noriel Vilela) as it is powering through Cain & Abel’s “Girl You Move Me,” which is full of heavy guitar lines and guttural wails, and is impossible not to listen to repeatedly, until you’re fully dragged into it yourself. Credit the band, too, for providing Jorge with the platform on which to truly excel: comprised of drummer Puppilo and guitarist Lucio Maia from Manguebeat band Nação Zumbi, and bassist (and famed film composer) Antonio Pinto, Almaz is the best group he’s ever worked with. On Paula Lima’s languid “Cirandar,” for example, Jorge’s cadence and vocal control give the song a bit more buoyancy, which balances well with Maia’s Spaghetti Western-inspired guitar lines and Puppilo’s steady beat. There’s a spaciousness to the piece that moves it away from a mere cover toward true artistic expression, and a large part of this is probably thanks to Pinto, whose work as a film composer surely informs the band’s interpretations and gives them an affecting expansiveness. This is best felt, perhaps, at the end, in the cover of Nelson Cavaquinho’s “Juizo Final,” or “Last Judgment,” a majestic rendition that fuses soul, psychedelia, and samba, along with plenty of reverb and a healthy sense of the unknown. Unfortunately, not every song is quite as successful; Michael Jackson’s “Rock with You” suffers a bit from the accent and an overly mellow staging (though that same approach works well in Roy Ayers’ oft-covered “Everybody Loves the Sunshine,” perhaps because the sultriness that Jorge explores there already existed), and the band’s version of Tim Maia’s “Cristina” isn’t particularly inventive (Jorge clearly owes a lot to Maia, as well as to Jorge Ben, to whom he also pays tribute on “Errare Humanum Est”), but as a whole, as a statement of what Brazilian music was and is, Seu Jorge and Almaz is irrevocable proof that Jorge’s ascent into the mainstream was no mistake. And it’s something everyone should hear. – Marisa Brown

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