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Come On

Rate It! Avg: 3.0 (34 ratings)

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Come On album cover
01
Transamerica
2:01
$0.49
02
I Just Want You To Be Free
5:00
$0.49
03
How Far
4:06
$0.49
04
Don't Feel Like Making Love
4:01
$0.49
05
Light Shines
4:41
$0.49
06
Can You Feel It
4:27
$0.49
07
Alicia Circles
2:03
$0.49
08
Jonestown
3:59
Free
09
Chasm
6:08
$0.49
10
Ten
6:18
$0.49
11
I Ain't Surprised
4:42
$0.49
12
Lurch
8:41
$0.49
Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 56:07

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Write a Review 7 Member Reviews

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user avatar

Well....

fuzzy_edges

Let me preface this by stating that I can't stand anything that sounds even remotely country or southern-rocky, so it should be a big deal that this got 3 stars from me. *BUT* The free track "Jonestown" is great! Super, duper cool! The only other song here that's in the same vein is "Transamerica", which is also very cool. So, if you're like me and your skin starts to crawl when you hear a southern drawl, then stick to tracks 1 and 8. The rest of you, give the album a chance, it's pretty good for what it is.

user avatar

Free track, schmee track

EMUSIC-01CB829C

Once you hear HOW FAR or I Ain't Surprised you'll know what time it is. This is rock n roll. These guys are loud as the sun.

user avatar

can't handle it

wns3

Re: Shame Club- Jonestown. I love hard rock and alt. rock, but I couldn't handle this rock band next door junk I just heard. Sorry fellas. Don't like to put anybody down.

user avatar

Definitely has 3 gems

solcon79

One of the gems is the free track, Jonestown. The other two I downloaded follow right after it. The rest? It's alright, but the singer doesn't thrill me. The three I like, the free track, Ten, and Chasm had that magic something that goes beyond the vocalist's ability and makes the song rock anyway. I agree that Hendrix was doubtlessly an influence here. Decent band. I bet they grow into something great, given the opportunity.

user avatar

Why not just make 10 the highest?

Nimbojimbo

Definitely has a Hendrix-based sound...really similar to The Mooney Suzuki or King's X

user avatar

Worth a look.

ewetwo

The free track alone is worth a full listen.

user avatar

Volume Martyrs

kaiju13

Solid, unpretentious, rock 'n' roll. They sound amazing live, but be forewarned- their knobs go to 11 and beyond. Probably the loudest band I've ever heard in my life. The 2nd loudest might be Jucifer. Highly recommended.

They Say All Music Guide

With no record label waiting in the wings, ready to release it, Shame Club’s third album, Come On, was recorded at a leisurely pace between 2006 and 2007, and even though the long-running St. Louis hard rockers would probably choose a slightly less positive adjective than “leisurely” (“tortuous,” perhaps), their patience certainly paid off when Detroit’s Small Stone picked up the record for a mid-2008 release. By then, the quartet had relinquished some of the disproportionate Thin Lizzy influence that had characterized their early work, and opened up their sound to a broader palette of classic rock cornerstones like Aerosmith and ZZ Top — all evident to differing degrees in songs like “Transamerica,” “Light Shines,” and “Chasm.” There’s also a discernible Southern rock aesthetic filtering into the twangy licks of “How Far,” the bombastic boogie of “I Ain’t Surprised,” and the melancholy melodies of “Sweet Mercy’s Gate”; an early-’70s blues-rock simplicity (think Bad Company, Foghat, and BTO) keeping others like “Don’t Feel Like Making Love” and “Can You Feel It” honest and straightforward, and an even more retro, post-flower-power vibe permeating the otherwise thumpin’ “I Just Want You to Be Free.” Finally, the band takes it down a notch for the acoustic instrumental, “Alicia Circles,” which is reminiscent of Zeppelin’s “Bron-Yr-Aur,” only with a hillbilly instead of Welsh folk flavor, and then closes the album with an extended, tipsy blues jam called “Lurch.” With all of these recognizable influences flowing through its gears, one might expect Come On to live out the image on its cover and sink to the bottom of the murky Mississippi, in abject anonymity. But, if anything, Shame Club’s wholesale reshuffling of all these elements renders the whole pretty natural in its own way. Its overall sense of restraint may all still prove pretty boring and sedate for new millennium listeners, tweaked on impatience and adrenalin, but classic rock lovers will likely get a huge kick out of sifting through these songs’ familiar sonic hallmarks. – Eduardo Rivadavia

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