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Desperate Straights

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (38 ratings)
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Desperate Straights album cover
01
Some Questions About Hats
1:53
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02
The Owl
2:17
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03
A Worm Is At Work
1:52
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04
Bad Alchemy
3:06
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05
Europa
2:48
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06
Desperate Straights
4:14
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07
Riding Tigers
2:02
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08
Apes In Capes
2:16
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09
Strayed
1:54
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10
Giants
1:57
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11
Excerpt From The Messiah
1:49
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12
In The Sickbay
2:09
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13
Caucasian Lullaby
8:25
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 36:42

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Slapp Happy + Henry Cow = bliss

robotclam

Absolutely one of the greatest albums I've ever heard. After thirty-five years, these songs still haunt and delight me.

eMusic Features

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From the Vault: Slapp Happy/Henry Cow’s Desperate Straights

By Mark Paytress, Contributor

On the face of it, early '70s pop subversives Slapp Happy and free music progressives Henry Cow worked at opposite ends of the musical spectrum. The former operated within the realm of the three-minute pop song, albeit of a disarmingly light and literate kind. Cow were a studious-looking bunch of jazz- and classically-inspired musos who juxtaposed highly structured, often lengthy works with daredevil feats of improvisation. United late in 1974 by an apparent desire to… more »

They Say All Music Guide

A surprising team up at the time of its release (1975), Desperate Straights is a surprisingly melodic album, light on the art school angst and heavy on the playfulness, which one would hardly expect from such determined socialists as these. But here it is: “Some Questions About Hats” sounds like a Kurt Weill outtake, “A Worm Is at Work” gallops along with a sweet tune. Dagmar Krause remains restrained and not given to flights of horrible fancy. “Strayed” is reminiscient of Kevin Ayers’s brand of art rock, and most of the songs clock in under two minutes. But never fear: the album ends on the eight minute “Caucasian Lullaby,” a minimal woodwind piece that suddenly bursts into one last jab of Krausian despair. – Ted Mills

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