|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

The Woods

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (254 ratings)
Retail
Member
The Woods album cover
01
The Fox
3:28
$0.69
$0.99
02
Wilderness
3:43
$0.69
$0.99
03
What's Mine Is Yours
5:00
$0.69
$0.99
04
Jumpers
4:27
$0.69
$0.99
05
Modern Girl
3:04
$0.69
$0.99
06
Entertain
4:58
$0.69
$0.99
07
Rollercoaster
4:57
$0.69
$0.99
08
Steep Air
4:07
$0.69
$0.99
09
Let's Call It Love
11:04  
10
Night Light
3:40
$0.69
$0.99
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 48:28

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Write a Review 7 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Modern Girl

joeyjojojnrshabadoo

...is an AMAZING song. However, this album--especially this song--appears to be converted to MP3 with way too hot inputs. There is severe clipping on this version of the album--especially on this song. Oddly, it works amazingly well with their sound but be forewarned it's likely not sounding as it was originally intended.

user avatar

the medium is the message

oldpunk

The "low production value," the hiss and distortion, were, I believe, intentional. It enhances the aggressiveness of the sound. Sort of a 70's Heavy Metal/thrash punk/grunge thing.

user avatar

LAND HO!!

AmpereLachaise

This is the best album by this amazing group, and unfortunately the last unless there is a reunion. I would argue they were the best trio around at the time they went into hiatus.

user avatar

Compression

Sten

I love SK, but this album is so compressed as to be almost unlistenable. Really. I don't know who SK used as a sound engineer on this but they need to fire them. I wish they would re-release another version of this...

user avatar

Top 100 of the 00's

DeluxBandito

Never has a band gone out with such an amazing group of songs and adventurous production. These ladies brought us some of the best rock of that decade.

user avatar

Production is awful, songs are great as always

SwellJoe

I bought this the day it was released. I'm a huge Sleater-Kinney fan, and have liked or loved every album. This one could be wonderful...but it's not. The songs are great, some of the best, most angular and beautiful bits of noise they've ever made. But, the production is awful. And, I don't mean that in the sense of "lo-fi". It lacks dynamics and is covered over with a sheen of nasty sounding and painful distortion. There are few records that are so poorly produced that I can't even listen to them; this is one of them, despite being chock full of awesome songs. I had held out hope that when it appeared here at eMusic it would miraculously be free of these production flaws...but, alas, the crappy sound remains, and I am sad. I agonized about giving this a 2 star rating, given how much I love Sleater-Kinney, and think they're one of the best bands of the past couple decades. But, it's just a really uncomfortable album to listen to.

user avatar

Hard Rockin'

Ah...Clem

Gone but not forgotten. A power trio that rocked with the best of them. I await the reunion.

eMusic Features

0

Who Are…The Coathangers

By Caryn Ganz, Contributor

The Coathangers couldn't play their instruments when they formed on a whim five years ago but now — somewhat to the dismay of singer/guitarist Julia Kugel — they're getting sort of awesome. "We're still kind of shitty. I tell myself that to keep the pressure off," she says on a break from her day job at a prom and bridal dress store. On their third disc, Larceny & Old Lace, the Atlanta quartet polish up… more »

0

Who Are…Screaming Females

By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

The bartender at Knitting Factory Brooklyn doesn't believe that Marissa Paternoster is 24. She laughs at first, until it becomes clear that he's not pulling her leg but is, in fact, skeptical, despite the insistence of both her and her bandmates. When she finally produces her New Jersey driver's license, his eyes widen. "Wow, OK! You look so young! I guess you must be eating your vegetables." She gets that a lot. Indeed, one of the… more »

0

Who Are…Grass Widow

By Caryn Ganz, Contributor

"A major theme in the way we work is we don't have a frontperson and we really do everything together," says Hannah Lew, "so I'm going to do my best to represent all of us." She makes a good point: Grass Widow's sound is completely dependent on interlocking voices and roaming guitar and bass lines that zip past and into each other, generating tense pockets of dissonance and beautiful moments of resolution. The group's second… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Far from the retreat implied in its title, The Woods is another passionate statement from Sleater-Kinney, equally inspired by the call-to-arms of their previous album, One Beat, and the give-and-take of their live sets, particularly their supporting slot on Pearl Jam’s 2003 tour. Throughout their career, the band has found ways to refine and elaborate on the fiery spirit that makes them so distinctive without diminishing it. The Woods is no exception — it may be Sleater-Kinney’s most mature and experimental album to date, but unlike most mature and experimental albums released by bands entering their second decade, it doesn’t forget to rock like a beast. The album’s opening salvo, “The Fox,” is shockingly feral, an onslaught of heavy, angry, spiralling guitars, ridiculously loud drums, and Corin Tucker’s inimitable, love-them-or-hate-them vocals. It’s so crushingly dense that it’s hard to believe it came from Dave Fridmann’s studio; reportedly, The Woods’ sessions were challenging for band and producer alike, but from the results, it’s clear that they pushed each other to make some of the best work of both of their careers. Though it may be hard to believe, at first, that this is a Fridmann-produced album, his contributions become a little clearer on tracks like the dysfunctional domesticity of “Wilderness,” which has the depth and spaciousness usually associated with his work. However, it’s easy enough to hear that The Woods is quintessential Sleater-Kinney. This may be the band’s most self-assured sounding work yet — their music has never lacked confidence and daring, but now they sound downright swaggering: “What’s Mine Is Yours” is a subversive nod to Led Zeppelin and also captures Sleater-Kinney’s own formidable power as a live act. Tucker’s voice and viewpoints are as thoughtful and fierce as ever, and as usual, she’s even better when aided and abetted by Carrie Brownstein’s harmonies, as on “Jumpers.” Capturing both the deeply depressing and liberating sides of suicide, the song moves from moody almost-pop to an intense but still melodic assault; unlike so many bands, Sleater-Kinney can go back and forth between several ideas within one song and never sound forced or muddled. A martial feeling runs through The Woods, but unlike the more overtly political One Beat, dissent is a more of an overall state of mind here. The more literal songs falter a bit, but “Modern Girl” is saved by its sharp lyrics (“I took my money and bought a donut/The hole’s the size of the entire world”), while Tucker and Brownstein’s dueling vocals and Janet Weiss’ huge drums elevate “Entertain” above its easy targets of retro rock and reality TV. However, the songs about floundering or complicated relationships draw blood: “Rollercoaster,” an extended food and fairground metaphor for an up-and-down long-term relationship with tough-girl backing vocals and an insistent cowbell driving it along, is as insightful as it is fun and witty. The unrepentantly sexy “Let’s Call It Love” is another standout, comparing love to a boxing match (complete with bells ringing off the rounds) and a game of poker. At 11 minutes long, the song might be indulgent (especially by Sleater-Kinney’s usually economic standards), but its ebbs and flows and well-earned guitar solos underscore the feeling that the band made The Woods for nobody but themselves. It flows seamlessly into “Night Light,” an equally spooky and hopeful song that offers promise, but no easy answers — a fitting end to an album that often feels more engaged in struggle than the outcome of it. One thing is clear, though: Sleater-Kinney remain true to their ideals, and after all this time, they still find smart, gripping ways of articulating them. – Heather Phares

more »