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Never Hear the End of It

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (202 ratings)
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Never Hear the End of It album cover
01
Flying High Again
1:25
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Who Taught You to Live Like That
3:02
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I've Gotta Try
2:22
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Everybody Wants You
3:07
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Listen to the Radio
3:09
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Fading into Obscurity
4:10
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I Can't Sleep
0:52
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Someone I Can Be True With
1:32
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Right or Wrong
2:40
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Something's Wrong
1:15
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Ana Lucia
3:21
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Before the End of the Race
2:27
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Blackout
1:39
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I Understand
5:28
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You Know What It's About
1:13
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Golden Eyes
1:01
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Can't You Figure It Out?
2:27
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Set in Motion
2:35
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Love Is All Around
3:21
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Will I Belong?
1:20
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Ill Placed Trust
3:26
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Live the Life You're Dreaming Of
4:08
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Living with the Masses
1:36
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HFXNSHC
1:11
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People Think They Know Me
2:12
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I Know You
4:00
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Last Time in Love
3:36
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It's Not the End of the World
2:28
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Light Years
1:51
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Another Way I Could Do It
3:31
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 30   Total Length: 76:25

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Write a Review 20 Member Reviews

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Embarrassment of Riches

frethepig

So many great hooks! It may take a while to digest it all, but so worth teh effort.

user avatar

Very comptetent Power Pop

KlevrPop

These guys put together some perfect sounding power pop, but something's missing. Every song sounds good, but I never find myself singing or humming a melody. Well done, but there's a reason they never made it big. It just doesn't have a unique identity to make it memorable.

user avatar

The best record of 2006

RobYou

This record for twelve credits? An absolute steal. If you like power pop music, you will LOVE this.

user avatar

Playing It All the Time...

rkoerth

Great cuts that run together and very well too. Don't be fooled by the running times all the songs on here are gems!

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Download the lot

mantochanga

Records like this don't come along every day. I'm with the guy who said it's well worth blowing 30 d/ls on this power pop instant classic. You need it all (assuming you worship at the rockin' altar of the Fabs, Raspberries and Big Star) - not a duff track on it - and fistfuls of real mindblowers. If Teenage Fanclub are one of your favourite groups (and why not?) just snap this up.

user avatar

My Favorite Album of the Year

ConceptJunkie

The Beatles are among this album's biggest influences, but so are 60's garage bands, early 80's punk, and 90's alternative. Sloan has managed to contact some sort of Platonic Ideal of Power Pop and bundle it into this rollercoaster of an album. Although constructed similar to side 2 of Abbey Road, with lots of short pieces running into each other, just like that classic, there is a cohesion to the whole that transcends the parts. Although the mood ranges from hard rockin' to sweet ballads and hits every level in between, the energy never lets up, and the album draws you in, and before you know it you are wrapped up in a rich, warm musical world. Although, I can't say for certain, there seems to be a concept album hiding in here, subtle perhaps, but in the age of out-of-context singles where the album is dying, Sloan goes to show that there is still room for the nearly lost art of combining tracks to form a cohesive and synergistic whole.

user avatar

**NO** excuses now!

spam4kel

I wrote another review previously that lamented having to spend 30 credits on this gem, but it was definitely worth it. Well, thanks to the new eMusic rules, now you can have the whole kit and kaboodle for a measly 12. So what on earth are you waiting for?

user avatar

Instant classic

section2

In my opinion, this is easily Sloan's best record since the '90s, and possibly their best ever. Despite the album's staggering number of tracks, the record holds together well as a whole. Tracks flow seamlessly into one another a la Abbey Road, and the record boasts so many brilliant melodies and clever turns of phrase that the band can afford to squander them on 2-minute get-in-get-out gems. Chris Murphy may be the most clever lyricist since Elvis Costello, and the songwriting, production and arranging are strong throughout. A great power-pop album, and one of the best records of '06. Highlights include "Listen To The Radio," the mellotron-tinged "Fading Into Obscurity," "I Understand," and "Set In Motion." But there are plenty more standout tracks where those came from.

user avatar

stream the whole album

snowdream

Listen to the whole album streamed (from Sloan's Myspace): http://216.69.135.140/MP3Players/Sloan/mySloanWimpy.html

user avatar

disappointing

waywardson

Coming after the brilliant "Action Pact", this album is a bit of a disappointment. Scattered amongst the 30 tracks are some real gems - the one/two punch of "Flying High Again" and "Who Taught You To Live Like That?", "I Understand" and "Another Way I Could Do It" - but the stand-outs are few and far between. The album is simply too long and too many of the songs are underdeveloped. If you're new to Sloan, skip this one and download "Action Pact", "Between The Bridges" or "A-Sides Win" instead.

eMusic Features

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By J. Edward Keyes, Editor-in-Chief

When we last left Army Navy in 2008, they had released an attention-grabbing, hook-laden bright-n-shiny debut, were racking up placements in high-profile films and seemed to be on a trajectory aimed decidedly upward. But plenty can happen in three years, as it turns out: in the wake of their debut's modest success, Army chief Justin Kennedy found himself swept up in a whirlwind relationship, the kind that kills at the same time as it thrills.… more »

They Say All Music Guide

A few records after their career-defining 1996 third album, One Chord Leads to Another, Sloan seemed to fall into a trap that snared many classicist guitar pop bands: their devotion to classic hooks and harmonies, the very thing that set them apart from their peers, began to turn from fresh to familiar. Not that the band’s skills diminished, but they were now merely reliable, with each new album offering subtle variations on their signature sound: one might be a little sunnier, one might be a little rougher, but each record could easily be classified as just another good Sloan album. All of this makes their eighth album, Never Hear the End of It, such a welcome shock: it’s unmistakably the work of the same band that loves ’60s guitar rock — everything from Merseybeat to the Velvet Underground — as much as they love new wave and college rock, but they have found a way to make the familiar sound fresh again by constructing the album as a seamless suite spread over 30 songs and fitting on a single CD. The easiest touchstone, of course, is the second side of Abbey Road, where brief snippets separated longer songs that were often multi-segmented, as they are here, but Never Hear the End of It isn’t nearly as lush or grandiose as the Beatles’ career-capping final recorded album. It’s densely saturated with color, yet it’s also lean and direct; it may swirl with rushes of psychedelic harmonies and shards of punk guitars, but it’s precisely constructed upon the quartet’s knack for sharp, memorable pop hooks, so there’s a sense of momentum and purpose in how the album winds through the detours and main roads on these 30 songs. This has some of the shaggy eclecticism of The White Album, yet it flows like Rundgren’s deliberate head trip A Wizard, a True Star, all the while never abandoning Sloan’s pop strengths, which makes Never Hear the End of It a rather remarkable piece of art pop — one where the concept is evident, but one where the pop elements are never sacrificed for art. Cut for cut, segment for segment, this is as indelible as the best of Sloan, but here the emphasis is not on the individual songs, as it has been on each of their albums in the past decade: the emphasis is on how each of these pieces, each of these hooks, joins together to create a kind of sonic sculpture. Never Hear the End of It is as concrete as that, but it’s also a record to get lost in, since it is dense with alluring details that create its own distinct atmosphere. Coming from a band that seemed to be settled comfortably within its own sound, this kind of album is indeed a surprise, but this layered, kaleidoscopic album would not have been possible without good straight-ahead records like Action Pact: on those albums, they mastered their popcraft, and here they apply what they’ve learned on an inventive, excellent record that’s their much-needed next great step forward. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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