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New Orleans Street Singer

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New Orleans Street Singer album cover
01
Looking For A Woman
2:29
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02
Walking Blues
3:01
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03
Careless Lover
2:36
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04
Saint James Infirmary
2:23
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05
High Society
1:37
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06
I Got My Questsionnaire
3:24
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07
Let Me Go Home, Whiskey
2:55
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08
Mama, Don't Tear My Clothes
2:11
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09
Trouble In Mind
2:50
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10
The Lonesome Road
1:50
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11
Helping Hand (A Thousand Miles Away From Home)
2:15
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12
One Room Country Shack
3:05
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13
Who's Been Foolin' You
2:26
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14
Drifting Blues
3:40
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15
Sophisticated Blues
2:09
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16
Come Back, Baby
2:09
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17
Rock Island Line
2:08
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18
See See Rider
3:11
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19
One Scotch, One Bourbon, One Beer
2:46
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20
Mean Old World
3:50
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21
Mean Old Frisco
2:37
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22
Every Day I Have The Blues
3:56
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23
Careless Love 2
2:34
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24
Drifting Blues 2
3:50
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25
The Lonesome Road 2
1:27
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 25   Total Length: 67:19

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I am sorry I did not discover snooks sooner

Conticreative

I found this recording because it was part of a Folkways podcast some time ago on the "Unfortunate rake" series. I very much wish I discovered Snooks sooner as he was truly a unique performer

user avatar

Snook died Feb 18 2009

mumbulla

Another of the best has gone.. listen up folks, particularly his earlier material if you like the blues..

user avatar

Love it!

lovingcaringbob

Makes me fell like I'm in the "old" New Orleans..........

eMusic Features

0

Remembering Snooks Eaglin

By John Morthland, Contributor

Snooks Eaglin, who died on February 18 at age 72, was a quintessential New Orleans character - the "Human Jukebox," as he was known locally, a guitarist and singer who claimed a repertoire of 2500 songs - blues, r&b, pop, rock, gospel, traditional - you name it, he played it. Eaglin recorded in every format, from solo acoustic to electric band with horns. And like many truly quintessential New Orleans characters, he never had a… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Ford “Snooks” Eaglin’s first released recordings, the ones collected here, suggested to the world that Eaglin was a great lost country-blues player when he was, in fact, an excellent electric guitar player and a gospel-influenced singer who much preferred playing R&B with a band. When folklorist Harry Oster heard Eaglin busking with his guitar on a street in the French Quarter in 1958, he whisked him over to Louisiana State University and recorded the tracks collected here, either assuming that Eaglin was a folk artist, or possibly even asking him to portray one for the sake of the recording. Either way, New Orleans Street Singer was a revelation when it was released by Folkways Records a year later in 1959, presenting to the world a gifted guitar player and a naturally soulful singer who brought a kind of jazzy New Orleans feel and groove to the folk-blues standards he was covering. The album is no less a revelation in the 21st century in this expanded edition from Smithsonian Folkways, although hindsight allows us to realize that the folk stance was probably more Oster’s preference than Eaglin’s. The guitar work is quick and fluid, with lead bursts that surprise and delight, continually settling on unexpected but highly effective chordal resolves (the original instrumental “Sophisticated Blues” is a case in point), and the singing throughout is steady and informed, sounding a bit like Ray Charles, with tinges of both gospel and jazz phrasing. In Eaglin’s hands traditional fare like “Saint James Infirmary,” the near-ragtime “High Society,” and the familiar “Mama, Don’t You Tear My Clothes” (a variant of “Baby, Let Me Follow You Down”) all become reborn and re-formed into definitive versions. The seven additional tracks expand the original album to around 70 minutes in length, and the alternate takes included of “Careless Love,” “Driftin’ Blues,” and “The Lonesome Road” show that Eaglin didn’t necessarily approach a song the same way twice in a row. – Steve Leggett

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