|

Click here to expand and collapse the player

Doggystyle

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (340 ratings)
Retail
Member
Doggystyle album cover
01
Bathtub
1:50
$0.49
$0.99
02
G Funk Intro
2:24
$0.49
$0.99
03
Gin And Juice
3:31
$0.49
$0.99
04
Tha Shiznit
4:41
$0.49
$0.99
05
Lodi Dodi
5:01
$0.49
$0.99
06
Murder Was The Case
3:38
$0.49
$0.99
07
Serial Killa
3:33
$0.49
$0.99
08
Who Am I (What's My Name)?
4:06
$0.49
$0.99
09
For All My Niggaz And Bitches
4:44
$0.49
$0.99
10
Ain't No Fun
4:06
$0.49
$0.99
11
Doggy Dogg World
5:39
$0.49
$0.99
12
Gz And Hustlas
4:36
$0.49
$0.99
13
Pump Pump
4:39
$0.49
$0.99
Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 52:28

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

Hua Hsu

Contributor

Hua Hsu edits the hip-hop section of URB Magazine and writes about music, culture and politics for Slate, the Village Voice, The Wire and various other magazine...more »

05.04.09
Snoop Dogg, Doggystyle
2009 | Label: Death Row Records / Entertainment One Distribution

"Who Am I?" the title of Doggystyle's lead single asked, but by then, you already knew. While 1993's Doggystyle was technically the lanky Long Beach rapper's first full-length, he had already enjoyed a starring role alongside Dr. Dre on the latter's paradigm shifting The Chronic, released a year earlier. If Doggystyle sounds a tad more hedonistic than your typical debut — and it still sounds that way — it's because it is more a victory… read more »

Write a Review 6 Member Reviews

Please register before you review a release. Register

user avatar

Best gangsta rap album ever

pastadutchie

Without a doubt this is the best gangsta rap album ever. Snoop hasn't made anything as good since.

user avatar

Dirt Dogg

RoyaleD

I don't care what your taste of music consists of or if you think Snoop Dogg is too lewd 4 the prudes, Doggystyle is probably 2 the Chronic what Goodie Mob's Soul Food was 2 OutKast's Southernplayeristic...4 a dude whose claim 2 fame was spittin opposite Dr Dre on the Deep Cover soundtrack, this may be the best dayum debut by any hip hop rookie

user avatar

An absolute classic!

Brian40

I love "Doggystyle" from beginning to end!! Thanks e-music for bringing this classic to the forefront of your playlist!!

user avatar

Top 5 All-Time Hip-Hop Albums

BigWil

This is one of the 5 greatest rap albums ever! Nuff said.

user avatar

Not available for download!

ericty

Just like the other Dre release on eMusic, this one is not available to the U.S. territory of Guam. I'm done with eMusic.

user avatar

Boo!!!

crowward

great album by one of death rows finest. pretty glad i got these before emusic... wow one wonders how i would have owned it otherwise

eMusic Features

0

25 Bands to See at Coachella 2012

By Wondering Sound Staff, Contributor

There is every other music festival and then there is Coachella, the California-desert weekend that, in many ways, set the template for all that followed. The first U.S. festival to boast big-ticket reunions and all-over-the-map booking, Coachella continues to maintain its distinctive, idiosyncratic personality. Needless to say, navigating such a wide array of music can be tricky. We've picked 25 acts worth making time for. more »

They Say All Music Guide

If Snoop Dogg’s debut, Doggystyle, doesn’t seem like a debut, it’s because in many ways it’s not. Snoop had already debuted as a featured rapper on Dr. Dre’s 1992 album, The Chronic, rapping on half of the 16 tracks, including all the hit singles, so it wasn’t like he was an unknown force when Doggystyle was released in late 1993. If anything, he was the biggest star in hip-hop, with legions of fans anxiously awaiting new material, and they were the ones who snapped up the album, making it the first debut album to enter the Billboard charts at number one. It wasn’t like they were buying an unknown quantity. They knew that the album would essentially be the de facto sequel to The Chronic, providing another round of P-Funk-inspired grooves and languid gangsta and ganja tales, just like Dre’s album. Which is exactly what Doggystyle is — a continuation of The Chronic, with the same production, same aesthetic and themes, and same reliance on guest rappers. The miracle is, it’s as good as that record. There are two keys to its success, one belonging to Dre, the other to Snoop. Dre realized that it wasn’t time to push the limits of G-funk, and instead decided to deepen it musically, creating easy-rolling productions that have more layers than they appear. They’re laid-back funky, continuing to resonate after many listens, but their greatest strength is that they never overshadow the laconic drawl of Snoop, who confirms that he’s one of hip-hop’s greatest vocal stylists with this record. Other gangsta rappers were all about aggression and anger — even Dre, as a rapper, is as blunt as a thug — but Snoop takes his time, playing with the flow of his words, giving his rhymes a nearly melodic eloquence. Compare his delivery to many guest rappers here: Nate Dogg, Kurupt, and Dat Nigga Daz are all good rappers, but they’re good in a conventional sense, where Snoop is something special, with unpredictable turns of phrase, evocative imagery, and a distinctive, addictive flow. If Doggystyle doesn’t surprise or offer anything that wasn’t already on The Chronic, it nevertheless is the best showcase for Snoop’s prodigious talents, not just because he’s given the room to run wild, but because he knows what to do with that freedom and Dre presents it all with imagination and a narrative thrust. If it doesn’t have the shock of the new, the way that The Chronic did, so be it: Over the years, the pervasive influence of that record and its countless ripoffs has dulled its innovations, so it doesn’t have the shock of the new either. Now, Doggystyle and The Chronic stand proudly together as the twin pinnacles of West Coast G-funk hip-hop of the early ’90s. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

more »