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Texas, 1986: Live at the Continental Club

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Texas, 1986: Live at the Continental Club album cover
01
Tom Violence
5:38
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02
Shadow of a Doubt
3:38
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03
Star Power
4:58
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04
Secret Girls
4:27
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05
Death to Our Friends
4:05
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06
Green Light
3:26
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07
Kill Yr Idols
3:13
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08
Ghost Bitch
6:06
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09
Expressway to Yr. Skull
8:10
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10
World Looks Red
2:49
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11
Confusion (Indeed)
2:21
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 48:51

Find a problem with a track? Let us know.

Wondering Sound

Review 0

Michael Azerrad

Contributor

eMusic editor-in-chief Michael Azerrad is the author of Come As You Are: The Story of Nirvana (Doubleday, 1993), which remains the definitive Nirvana biography,...more »

04.22.11
Sonic Youth, Texas, 1986: Live at the Continental Club
2002 | Label: Sonic Youth Recordings - Smells Like Records / Revolver

In 1986, Sonic Youth was one of the most exhilarating live bands you could see. Their show was an electric firestorm, with all the lunging, flailing and hammering of a massacre in a Hollywood mansion, an intoxicating, ecstatic violence imbued with the same splattering creative force of the neo-expressionist art then ruling the band's native downtown Manhattan.

Originally a fan-club-only release, this recording documents the dawn of Sonic Youth's intense three-year peak — an April 12,… read more »

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The true originals

shields541

A bit on the chaotic side (a good thing);this show seems to come from the period when they started to become an art-ROCK band as opposed to an ART-rock band,

user avatar

fuck the hipsters...

pabs138

I guess I'm the opposite of most SY fans b/c I like their mid-nineties stuff better than than the late-eighties stuff. You can HEAR the history on this record......fuck, it's undescribable. I'd give up my first born to be at this show.........amazing.

user avatar

Awesome

robynblocker

I remember finding this years ago when I was in high school. This was before I'd even heard EVOL, so I went backwards into that album (or perhaps you could say forwards)after hearing the songs' first performance on this gem. For any Youth lover, this is a must-have.

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