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The Assassin's Apprentice

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (3 ratings)
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The Assassin's Apprentice album cover
01
The Assassin's Apprentice
5:52
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02
Give It Up
3:49
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03
The Longest Road
6:06
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04
Expectations
3:59
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05
The Station
4:38
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06
Lark And Duke
2:21
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07
Down The Wire
5:58
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08
Echoes
4:03
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09
(I Heard That) Lonesome Whistle
3:39
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10
The Brilliance You Need
6:16
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11
The Life
5:01
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12
Martin's
3:07
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 54:49

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Thoughtful, intense Canadian "new folk"

ookpik

Stephen Fearing is a Canadian singer-songwriter whose relative obscurity in the US remains a mystery to me. His songs are thoughtful, lyrical blends of personal and political material with music and messages that keep me humming for days. The title cut of "The Assassin's Apprentice" is a particular favorite, adding an unusual production (for folk) that includes some lovely horn solos as well as percussion to some of his best lyrics.

They Say All Music Guide

On his first record for Canadian independent label True North (his previous two have since been re-released by them), Fearing teamed with Los Lobos’ Steve Berlin as his producer. The result was a more polished work than his previous and the musicianship throughout is excellent. Contributions from Richard Thompson and Sarah McLachlan augment Fearing’s skilled acoustic guitar playing, which is highlighted on the instrumentals “Lark and Duke” and “Martin’s” (dedicated to guitarist Martin Carthy). The archetypal singer/songwriter, Fearing’s songs on this album reflect on topics such as loneliness (“Down the Wire”), love (“Give It Up”), and life on the road (“The Life”). He celebrates his “Canadianness” in the invigorating “The Longest Road” and dabbles in the blues with “Lonesome Whistle,” popularized by Little Feat more than a decade earlier. – Rob Caldwell

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