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Grace For Drowning

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Grace For Drowning album cover
01
Grace for Drowning
2:06
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02
Sectarian
7:41  
03
Deform to Form a Star
7:51  
04
No Part of Me
5:44
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05
Postcard
4:29
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06
Raider Prelude
2:23
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07
Remainder the Black Dog
9:27  
08
Belle De Jour
2:59
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09
Index
4:49
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10
Track One
4:16
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11
Raider II
23:21  
12
Like Dust I Have Cleared from My Eye
8:01  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 83:07

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Evolved, Yet Textures Close to Older PT

MusicLab

Don't get me wrong, I love most of the Porcupine Tree discography, but the LPs from "Fear of a Blank Planet" onward have had that quasi-speed metal feel that took PT's earlier space-out prog sound into a grittier, heavier, more menacing sound. While Steve will always have that element of danger hanging around any corner, this album does spread out- not unlike earlier PT- and hints at loveliness and quite intrigue that has largely been missing from latter day PT. Loved the first Steven Wilson solo disk and this is right up there with it. Brilliant stuff.

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Wow.

ftmckinstry

This is brilliant. It's complex and full of emotional subtleties; I notice something new and amazing every time I listen to it. Takes me into another world.

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A Marvelous Journey

HoppyPrice

King Crimson meets the Beach Boys, and all that jazz. The harmonies on Deform to Form a Star are wonderful. Steven is in no hurry to get where he's going, but since he's going to a really nice place, you can just sit back and enjoy the journey. Porcupine Tree fans will not be disappointed.

They Say All Music Guide

For prolific British progressive rocker Steven Wilson, the two-CD set Grace for Drowning is his second official solo album, following 2008′s Insurgentes. Recording under his own name, Wilson tends to fall somewhere between his popular Porcupine Tree group project and his ambient recordings as Bass Communion. Grace for Drowning’s two discs are divided into one called Deform to Form a Star and another called Like Dust I Have Cleared from My Eye, both named after tracks on them. In the relatively sparse lyrics that Wilson sings with a calm, British-accented tenor, he seems melancholy at first, apparently suffering from the aftermath of a romantic breakup. “There’s nothing left for me to say or do,” he declares in “Postcard.” By the second disc, he has become angrier about the situation, but the closing title track finds him reaching resolution and moving on. The words are spread out over music that builds and ebbs in a manner that allows for different styles and soloing by Wilson and a few musical guests. He is not abashed about evoking his prog predecessors. The obvious antecedent is Pink Floyd, particularly recalled in the space rock of “No Part of Me.” The 23-minute “Raider II,” coming toward the end, allows room for a flute-and-piano section that could have been excerpted from a Traffic album as well as guitar-bass-drum sections in rapid 6/4 time suggestive of Yes. By the end, Wilson has subsided into an ambient coda on “Like Dust I Have Cleared from My Eye,” as if readying himself for the next Bass Communion album. Grace for Drowning has a particular conception in terms of its emotional journey from sadness through anger to acceptance, but it is also just another in a lengthy discography of albums by Wilson under various names in relatively similar styles. – William Ruhlmann

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