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Diary (2009 Edition)

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Diary (2009 Edition) album cover
01
Seven
4:46
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02
In Circles
4:58
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03
Song About an Angel
6:14
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04
Round
4:09
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05
47
4:34
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06
The Blankets Were the Stairs
5:27
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07
Pheurton Skeurto
2:33
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08
Shadows
4:46
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09
48
4:45
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10
Grendel
4:53
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11
Sometimes
5:47
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12
8
5:15
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13
9
6:03
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 64:10

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Wondering Sound

Review 0

Douglas Wolk

Contributor

Douglas Wolk writes about pop music and comic books for Time, the New York Times, Rolling Stone, Wired and elsewhere. He's the author of Reading Comics: How Gra...more »

03.15.10
Sunny Day Real Estate, Diary (2009 Edition)
Label: Sub Pop Records

This 1994 debut album is ground zero for the emo wave of the '90s — if its arpeggiated riffs and Jeremy Enigk's introverted wail sound almost overfamiliar now, that's because other bands have been lifting its mood and tone for the past decade and a half. The lyrics, co-written by Enigk and guitarist Daniel Hoener, are very much a portrait of personal consciousness from the inside — think of the album's title! — but the… read more »

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it's all different now.

75nathans

this was one of the first "i hear things different now" records i bought in college back in 1994. definitely a record that i visit often. the new version is nice b/c it contains the non-LP tracks that i had never owned before (though i did have a dubbed copy of "8" from the batman forever soundtrack).

user avatar

I like the ones with numbers

jimmydelarme

This is a great album. SDRE have a knack for slowly building a song up and then just exploding it at the end. I love that. I suggest "48," "Seven" and "in circles"

eMusic Features

2

36 Songs To Soothe the Pain

By Wondering Sound Staff, Contributor

Whether you're happily married or told Cupid to shove it a long time ago, we can all agree on one thing: to quote the one-and-only Nazareth, "Love hurts/ Love scars/ Love wounds/ And mars." Or something. That's why we went ahead and compiled a list of 36 Songs To Soothe the Pain, from the bloodletting confessionals of Neko Case, Bright Eyes and Sunny Day Real Estate to the melancholic melodies of Sigur Rós, the Shangri-Las… more »

They Say All Music Guide

Sunny Day Real Estate’s debut album, Diary, virtually defined emo in the ’90s, laying much of the groundwork (along with Weezer) for the genre’s end-of-decade indie prominence. Although emo existed (both as a term and as a style) prior to Diary, it hadn’t yet risen out of the deepest hardcore punk underground, save for a few bands on the Dischord label. For all intents and purposes, Diary was the album that made emo accessible, fusing its gnarled guitars and nakedly emotional vocals with more than a hint of melodic Seattle grunge. SDRE’s song structures are far more oblique than, for example, the similarly anthemic Pearl Jam, but it’s still easy to miss the group’s main inspirations if you’re not looking for them. Perhaps that’s because, at bottom, SDRE don’t sound much like their emo predecessors. For one, there are plenty of quiet, arpeggiated passages and contrasting dynamics; for another, vocalist Jeremy Enigk is more of a crooner than a screamer at heart, and the underlying tenderness in his voice breathes majesty into the group’s slow, languid melodies. Yet, while Diary’s true heart lies in its soaring, introspective anthems (like the band’s signature song, “In Circles”), the more tortured, visceral moments balance things out, preventing the album from wallowing in melodramatic self-obsession. In retrospect, Diary doesn’t quite fulfill all of its ambitions — there are a few underfocused moments that don’t achieve the epic sweep of the album’s best compositions. That occasional inconsistency makes it feel somewhat less realized than their proggier post-reunion work, especially since Enigk would develop into a far more distinctive vocalist. But even if it isn’t quite the top-to-bottom masterpiece its legions of imitators suggest, Diary still ranks as arguably the definitive ’90s emo album, and an indispensable introduction to the genre. – Steve Huey

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