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Kill The Child

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01
Kill The Child
62:18  
Album Information
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Total Tracks: 1   Total Length: 62:18

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60 min. for 1 credit??

borntochill

okay, i took the bait. the sound quality is lacking a bit but, if your into the swans its a good deal.

eMusic Features

1

Swans’ Michael Gira is Searching for God

By Louis Pattison, International Editor

When Swans emerged from the white heat of New York's no wave scene 32 years ago, they sounded like nothing else. There were fellow travelers — groups like Sonic Youth and Mars, or contemporary composers like Glenn Branca — who shared their passion for dense, layered sound and extreme, ecstatic volume. But Swans' leader Michael Gira was his own beast. By day a construction worker hauling concrete and girders, at night he turned into a… more »

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Icon: Michael Gira

By Philip Sherburne, Contributor

When Swans released their album The Seer in 2012, it was cause for celebration on several counts. For one thing, no one had ever expected them to return after they disbanded in 1997, so their comeback two years prior was alarming to say the least. But The Seer also marked an incredible 30 years of Swans' projects (minus the 13 that Michael Gira, the group's driving force, took off to pursue different directions with his… more »

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Icon: Michael Gira

By Philip Sherburne, Contributor

When Swans released their album The Seer in 2012, it was cause for celebration on several counts. For one thing, no one had ever expected them to return after they disbanded in 1997, so their comeback two years prior was alarming to say the least. But The Seer also marked an incredible 30 years of Swans' projects (minus the 13 that Michael Gira, the group's driving force, took off to pursue different directions with his… more »

0

Who Are…Tombs

By Joe Gross, Contributor

Mike Hill is old school. The 42-year old Hudson Valley native has been in bands for decades, from the Boston/NYC metalcore act Anodyne, which ripped off faces from 1997-2005, to the post-metallic Versoma to Tombs, which Hill assembled in 2008. Their second album for Relapse Records, Path of Totality, melts together three decades of metal, punk and Goth rock into a single, flailing roar. At the same time, Hill runs Black Box Recordings and has engineered… more »

They Say All Music Guide

The minimal packaging says nothing about exactly where the concerts in question occurred, except for the curt “Recorded U.K./Germany/Yugoslavia”; nor does it specify who make up the band’s personnel, outside of an audible Gira and Jarboe, plus presumably guitarist Westberg. Recorded at various dates between 1985 and 1987, Kill the Child consists mostly of Children of God tracks, though “Coward” and a strong “A Screw (Holy Money)” both put in appearances as well. Quite whether this is another semi-official bootleg getting a legitimate release (probable, considering the at-times muddy sound and overheard audience chat) or an item direct from the archives is something not even the official Swans website fully confirms. Regardless of exact origin, Kill presents a fierce view of the band at their explosive, overwhelming best live. “Like a Drug (Sha La La)” starts things off viciously, building into a massive guitar/drum ending, only to be matched by the tremendous start to “Beautiful Child” seconds later. Extreme enough on Children, here the song lays the studio version to waste, with Gira’s unearthly scream/singing perfectly in sync with the band’s take-no-prisoners performance. “Blind Love,” however, takes centerpiece honors, delivered in a truly stunning 15-minute performance that starts off wracked enough and then, when the band fully kicks in, alternates between frighteningly calm and incredibly destructive, with Gira and Westberg especially performing as if their lives depended on it. Jarboe gets her specific moment to shine with a mesmerizing version of “Blood and Honey,” the one moment of relative semi-calm on an otherwise outright pummeling disc. [Note: there is no song list on the actual packaging itself, and the entire CD is mastered as one long track.] – Ned Raggett

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