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KickSnareHat

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KickSnareHat album cover
01
Freeman
5:37
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02
Bugs
4:02
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03
Stains Like Water
6:20
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04
Heart Will Take You Home
3:42
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05
Water the Desert (Intro)
1:45
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06
Water the Desert
3:53
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07
Don't Want Me Around
3:13
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08
Once In A While
4:06
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09
Win Again
3:44
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10
What Did I Ever Do
5:09
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11
Family Tree
4:11
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12
Get Out Of Denver
4:18
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 50:00

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They Say All Music Guide

The cover art for Swinging Steaks’ fifth album, Kicksnarehat, proudly proclaims their hometown: “Swinging Steaks Boston, MA.” But listeners who haven’t seen the cover could easily be excused for mistakenly thinking that this is Austin, not Boston. There is a distinct country rock shading to the album, replete with a rootsy power twang reminiscent of the Jayhawks and Uncle Tupelo and flashes of Cracker-esque goofiness. But the Steaks are even more consistent than some of their influences in their ability to build sharp, memorable hooks on solid roots rock foundations. The opening “Freeman,” a highly charged anthem centered around muscular electric guitar and hammond organ power chords, would sound right at home alongside many of the biggest AOR hits of the 80s and 90s. It has the feel of a sure-fire single, but the band’s best work comes later on the record. Songs like “Heart Will Take You Home” and “Win Again” and the irresistibly quirky “Bugs” demonstrate that the four accomplished musicians are just as comfortable in mellower settings, balancing the amp-busting thrust of their rock tunes with acoustic guitars, mandolin, and banjo. The band concludes the record with a foot-stomping Chuck Berry-esque cover of Bob Seger’s “Get out of Denver” that gives pianist Jim Gambino a chance to show off his chops. It’s a perfect ending for an enormously spirited album that exhibits impressive polish and skill without diminishing its infectious good ole boy charm. – Evan Cater

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