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Hanapepe Dream

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (90 ratings)
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Hanapepe Dream album cover
01
Great Big Boat
2:44
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02
Blackjack Davey
5:48
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03
Moonlight Lady
5:03
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04
King Edward's Throne
3:47
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05
African Herbman
3:56
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06
Baby You're My Destiny
3:28
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07
Stagger Lee
4:39
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08
Living' On Easy
3:25
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09
My Creole Belle
2:55
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10
All Along The Watchtower
3:27
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11
Hanapepe Dream
5:38
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 11   Total Length: 44:50

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Livin' on Easy

ooftygoofty

Music works in different ways on different days. The first time I heard this song at volume I had to restart it so I could get my fat azz out of my chair and HULA to the tune. God blesses us if we'll listen for it.

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Holidays in the Sun

thatway57

As most reveiwers have commented with Taj Mahal you always get quality plus a few surprises. Taj always tries to broaden his listeners horizons and this set is no exception. A relaxing sound that is better than taking a holiday.

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Taj Classic

teapot1

This is 1 of 2 discs Taj has done with the Hula Blues Band and both are well worth repeated listens. He came to Australia with this band and such a great show (as his tend to be).So download this now and enjoy some Hula blues.

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Blues, but not Blues

Average-Nights-Jack

Just like Ry Cooder, Taj never lets you down, provided you don't expect him to play the blues every time. Using his vast knowledge and experience of world music and then fusing the sounds of the Pacific and Caribbean (with just a little bit of blues) you end up with a very pleasant mix of damn good music, just like Ry Cooder.

They Say All Music Guide

Recorded in the year 2000 in Bremen and in Hawaii, Hanapepe Dream is ethnomusicologist, guitarist, and composer Taj Mahal’s own gumbo of Caribbean, Polynesian, African, and American folk roots styles done up in the glorious dress of “song,” for anyone who has ears to hear, feet to shuffle, and an ass to shake. Featuring a large band replete with three ukuleles (little, baritone, and tenor), Hawaiian steel guitars, slack key guitars, horns, steel drums, and standard bass, drums, and guitars, Mahal reveals why he’s a master of combining traditions and musics from different histories and regions. In fact, Mahal can prove, via his very fine performance here, that all forms of soul and blues, reggae, jazz, and rock & roll music come from one source and that source lies in the African Diaspora. Mahal’s own songs here are fine offerings: There’s “Great Big Boat,” the opener full of celebratory drums and choral singing and loping winds and horns, and “Baby You’re My Destiny,” a slippery swing tune that borders on Hawaiian folk music and could have been recorded by Django Reinhardt with Louis Prima, Gabby Pahinui, and Ike Quebec sitting in. But it is in the traditional folk tunes such as “Blackjack Davey,” “King Edward’s Throne,” and the most unique and gorgeous reading of “Stagger Lee” ever that Mahal pulls out the stops and showcases his entire vision. The latter song becomes an expression of how community embraces story, movement, tragedy, celebration, and shared space and time. They come roiling from different musical approximations — not appropriations — as Mahal doesn’t steal anything here; he offers the ancient sources of this music up as easily identified if not easily separated, and engages the song itself as the easiest and most memorable form of communication we have as human beings. Mahal offers further proof by using Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower” and Richie Havens’ “African Herbman” as current examples of cross miscegenation of course material. In the Dylan song, jazz entwines reggae and calypso as well as Hawaiian slack key, and the Havens track moves through the Nigerian and Malian folk legacies and brings them to the Caribbean for articulation. Any way you hear it, Hanapepe Dream is further evidence that Mahal has been on a hot streak these past six years, and it continues here with a vengeance. – Thom Jurek

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