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Tangram 2008

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (6 ratings)
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Tangram 2008 album cover
01
Wisdom And Tragedy
7:45
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02
Dragon In The House
4:21
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03
Wu Wei
4:43
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04
Leaving The Masters For Good
2:03
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05
Point Of No Return
10:53  
06
Dream Puzzle
5:02
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07
Terra Coda
4:36
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 7   Total Length: 39:23

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Deep Sound

thatway57

I have no qualms about re-recording this classic 1980 release and updating the sound. It is a gorgeous piece of music and the 2008 version in my opinion passes as a stand alone release. Great stuff.Thanks emusic for having lots of new TD. Can we have some more still?

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Different Place, /different Time

dikawl

TD has always been Edgar Froese's baby. As such, he has seen fit to do like all artists, play with his children. Here he takes one fro 28 past and tries a rethink. In some ways , for example, as a standalone, it is quite successful if you don't compare it to the original. A first blush is usually the most passionate, but a more sober second look can reveal differing highlights and approaches, such as we see here. I do like this work but in a differing way than the original. Here I like the more lush arrangements for their richer textures but I like the original for its daring. This is well worth the download.

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1

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0

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They Say All Music Guide

It’s a very rare occurrence when a band can take a classic album and literally remake it. It happens from time to time, but with the possible exception of Van Morrison’s live version of Astral Weeks, it seldom works. Enter Tangerine Dream and Tangram 2008. Tangram was the last album — released in 1980 — that really showcased Edgar Froese and Christopher Franke in their true form — Peter Baumann had left after 1976′s brilliant Stratosfear — though it was a new direction. The idea behind this was, of course, Froese’s and the result is mixed at best. While it follows the original Tangram’s sequence, there is a distraction right from the jump: an insistent, single-pulse rhythm track that does not come from one of their trademark sequencers, but from a pre-programmed drum machine. Adding orchestral elements to fill out the sound takes away the original album’s sense of the unexpected and the listener’s anticipation. What was once a rich listening experience has become merely a pleasant one. This is not offensive, and it is worth hearing a time or two. If you are a diehard who feels that Tangerine Dream can do no wrong, you already know you need this. But Tangram 2008 feels more like a misfire than an extension of a classic recording. – Thom Jurek

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