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Music For Real Airports

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Music For Real Airports album cover
01
M1
5:12
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02
Terminal EMA
5:40
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03
DISinformation Desk
5:19
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04
Passport Control
3:49
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05
Wait Behind This Line
4:10
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06
Empty Seat Calculations
3:26
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07
Strip Light Hate
3:25
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08
Future Delay Thinking
4:21
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09
Lounge
0:57
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10
Delay 9
4:20
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11
Sleep Deprivation 1
4:53
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12
Sleep Deprivation 2
6:26
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13
He Knows
1:43
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14
Business Car Park 9
5:09
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 14   Total Length: 58:50

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Music for *real* airports?

McEwin

I haven't heard Black Dog, nor do I intend to. However: Eno's Ambient 1 was actually used as an installation piece at San Francisco Int'l Airport in the mid '70s (commissioned by them I think). The intention was music that could be listened to at several levels, as 'muzak' on up to a more centering sound in the midst of busy kerfuffle. It worked, and still works. If I want anxious and disgruntled air trael, I'll fly through Newark, not download an album. Brian Eno 1 Black Dog 0

They Say All Music Guide

The adjective in the title of the Black Dog’s 2010 full-length separates it from Brian Eno’s Ambient 1: Music for Airports, which was a highly idealized vision of airport travel. Eno’s music often sounds reminiscent of some future utopia, separated from the sights and smells of thousands of anxious or disgruntled people in close contact. Ken Downie’s pragmatic approach to soundtracking air travel here is evident not only from the track titles, which include “DISinformation Desk,” “Strip Light Hate,” and “Sleep Deprivation 2.” Although his aural imagery is nearly as anodyne and antiseptic as Eno’s, there’s a lingering air of menace, or at least unease, that contrasts with the beatific beatlessness of Eno’s ambient music. The sounds are appropriately textured, and often recall the sound of unidentified persons far down dark hallways, but with brittle beats and echoing effects — most sampled from airport sources during Downie’s frequent travels. – John Bush

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