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Softly Towards The Light

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (29 ratings)
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Softly Towards The Light album cover
01
Run With Me Run
3:37
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02
Gloomy Monday Morning
3:14
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03
When You're Not There
3:46
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04
Everything's Fine
4:42
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05
Number Ten Girl
4:43
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06
Lead Me To Your Fire
3:58
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07
Look What You've Done
3:15
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08
Can't Stop These Tears (From Falling)
3:42
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09
How Did We Get Here
3:58
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10
Don't Be Afraid To Ask
3:25
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 10   Total Length: 38:20

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Pure Light

TheHypnoticBridge

If the psychedelic side of pop music is your passion, Softly Towards The Light deserves your undivided attention. Songs like Don't Be Afraid To Ask, Number Ten Girl, Run With Me, and How Did We Get Here show the Black Hollies have the psych chops to join the rarefied circle of premier US psych pop bands – right up there with The Asteroid No. 4, Outrageous Cherry, and The Pillbugs.

They Say All Music Guide

After recording two albums in their home studio, the Black Hollies left the bachelor pad and ventured out into the real world — or at least as far as Hoboken, NJ, where they shacked up inside the Pigeon Club to record 2009′s Softly Towards the Light. Earlier albums introduced the band’s swirling, reverent brand of ’60s psychedelia, but Light couches those fuzzed-out guitar solos and double-tracked vocals in a more appropriate context, adding nostalgic production and a wider range of instruments to the mix. Justin Angelo Morey has always been the group’s captain, but his bandmates do their own share of ship-steering this time around — particularly Jon Gonnelli, who eschews his usual guitar duties and focuses on a wealth of Mellotron, keyboard, and organ parts. The chief agenda of every Black Hollies album is to evoke the ’60s, a decade that inspires every facet of the band’s songwriting, and Softly Towards the Light accomplishes that task with the most appropriate production of the band’s career. – Andrew Leahey

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