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Rubber Factory

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (2015 ratings)
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Rubber Factory album cover
01
When The Lights Go Out
3:23
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02
10 A.M. Automatic
2:59
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03
Just Couldn't Tie Me Down
2:57
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04
All Hands Against His Own
3:16
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05
The Desperate Man
3:54
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06
Girl Is On My Mind
3:28
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07
The Lengths
4:54
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08
Grown So Ugly
2:27
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09
Stack Shot Billy
3:21
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10
Act Nice And Gentle
2:41
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11
Aeroplane Blues
2:50
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12
Keep Me
2:52
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13
Till I Get My Way
2:31
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 41:33

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Apples of the Buckeye!

Okieeagle

Music fans everywhere should be thankful for these fruits of the Buckeye state. Writing witty, gritty, and irreverantly catchy blues rock like this was thought lost on the prodigal likes of Jack White. But never fear my blues rock loving peers, we have yet another set of practitioners of blues rock revivalism!! I'm gonna preach it to the land, let them spead their words and music like winds on the plains!!

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You Need This Album

Buckeye4Life

You work hard every day. You deal with the boss, your spouse, the kids. You need to do something for yourself. Get this album. It will help heal your soul. I'm not exaggerating.

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Blues revisited

justino_dea

Every once and a while someone comes along and blows what you think is a exhausted genre out of the water. Gritty with a Hendrix-esque vivacity, The Black Keys have me revisiting blues with a new sense of what is possible for the genre.

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Great Freakin album

prookie

Excellent album from start to finish....great garage/blues band.......

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My favorite

UncoolMusicCritic

If your new to The Black Keys start off with this album. This is my favorite of all their work to date. Don't get me wrong, The new album is also great. In fact, all of their work is great. If it were to late 70's early 80's they would be playing arenas.

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Lov'em

outoftheclosetmusicsnob

This is a good piece of work- not my favorite but great to have on in the car when you've been driving too long and need to wake up

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You need this

Jack67

If you consider yourself a music fan, you need this album! Music history and music future combined with wondertwin powers!

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essential

buckeyematt

if you're going to download one BK's album, it should be this one. Forward and back, you can build from there.

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Outstanding...

xrayman

A unique, timeless sound.

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Let the Keys Roll On!!!

hardylodge

I'm a fan. I"ve been playing them for my friends and getting the same responds each time "What's that, I like it". I have one CD left to get, pacing myself. I just picked up Dan Auerbach CD WOW!!! ROCKBLUE ON

eMusic Features

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Six Degrees of Junior Kimbrough’s All Night Long

By John Morthland, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

Six Degrees of Junior Kimbrough’s All Night Long

By John Morthland, Contributor

It used to be easier to pretend that an album was its own perfectly self-contained artifact. The great records certainly feel that way. But albums are more permeable than solid, their motivations, executions and inspirations informed by, and often stolen from, their peers and forbearers. It all sounds awfully formal, but it's not. It's the very nature of music — of art, even. The Six Degrees features examine the relationships between classic records and five… more »

0

New Blues Rising: The Black Keys

By John Morthland, Contributor

The Black Keys are easily the freshest thing to happen to blues in this millennium, but you can't really call them a blues band. But then, neither can you call the duo — drummer Patrick Carney and guitarist/vocalist David Auerbach — a rock band. Or even a blues-rock band in the conventional sense of the term. Their music is garage rock that knows that blues is at the very heart of rock, and it is… more »

They Say All Music Guide

It’s easy to think of the Black Keys as the flip side of the White Stripes. They both hail from the Midwest, they both work a similar garage blues ground and both have color-coded names. If they’re not quite kissing cousins, they’re certainly kindred spirits, and they’re following surprisingly similar career arcs, as the Keys’ third album, Rubber Factory, is neatly analogous to the Stripes’ third album breakthrough, White Blood Cells. Rubber Factory finds the duo expanding, stretching, and improving, coming into its own as a distinctive, original, thoroughly great rock & roll band. With 2003′s Thickfreakness, guitarist/vocalist Dan Auerbach and drummer/producer Patrick Carney delivered on the promise of a raw, exciting debut by sharpening their sound and strengthening the songwriting, thereby upping the ante for their next record, and Rubber Factory doesn’t disappoint. Instead, it surprises in a number of delightful ways, redefining the duo without losing the essence of the band. For instance, the production has more shades than either The Big Come Up or Thickfreakness — witness the creepy late-night vibe of the opening “When the Lights Go Out” or how the spare, heartbroken, and slide guitar-laden “The Lengths” sounds like it’s been rusted over — but it’s also harder, nastier, and uglier than those albums, piled with truly brutal, gut-level guitar. Yet through these sheets of noise, vulnerability pokes through, not just on “The Lengths,” but in a lazy, loping, terrific version of the Kinks’ “Act Nice and Gentle.” And, like their cover of the Beatles’ “She Said, She Said” on their debut, “Act Nice and Gentle” illustrates that even if the Black Keys have more legit blues credentials than any of their peers, they’re nevertheless an indie rock band raised with not just a knowledge of classic rock, but with excellent taste and, most importantly, an instinct for what makes great rock & roll. They know that sound matters, not just how a band plays but how a band is recorded, and that blues sounds better when it’s unvarnished, which is why each of their records feels more like a real blues album than anything cut since the ’60s. But they’re not revivalists, either. They’ve absorbed the language of classic rock and the sensibility of indie rock — they’re turning familiar sounds into something nervy and fresh, music that builds on the past yet lives fearlessly in the moment. On a sheer gut level, they’re intoxicating and that alone would be enough to make Rubber Factory a strong listen, but what makes it transcendent is that Auerbach has developed into such a fine songwriter. His songs have enough melodic and lyrical twists to make it seem like he’s breaking rules, but his trick is that he’s doing this within traditional blues-rock structures. He’s not just reinvigorating a familiar form, he’s doing it without a lick of pretension; it never seems as if the songs were written, but that they’ve always existed and have just been discovered, which is true of any great blues song. Carney gives these songs the production they deserve — some tunes are dense and heavy with guitars, others are spacious and haunting — and the result is the most exciting and best rock & roll record of 2004. – Stephen Thomas Erlewine

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