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The Notorious Byrd Brothers

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The Notorious Byrd Brothers album cover
01
Artificial Energy
2:18
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02
Goin' Back
3:26
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03
Natural Harmony
2:11
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04
Draft Morning
2:43
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05
Wasn't Born to Follow
2:04
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06
Get to You
2:39
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07
Change Is Now
3:21
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08
Old John Robertson
1:49
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09
Tribal Gathering
2:05
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10
Dolphin's Smile
1:59
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11
Space Odyssey
3:52
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12
Moog Raga
3:24
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13
Bound to Fall
2:11
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14
Triad
3:29
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15
Goin' Back
3:55
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16
Draft Morning
2:55
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17
Universal Mind Decoder
3:36
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Album Information
EDITOR'S PICK

Total Tracks: 17   Total Length: 47:57

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One of My Favorites

DJClifton1950

This album is one of my favorite all time albums. I don't know about the additions to this version of the album, but the original lineup of songs did not have one weak song. To me this was the Byrds at their best. The feelings evoked by this music is at times otherworldly - Space Oddysey, to other types of existence - Dolphin's Smile, to the reality of the angst of a young man facing forced induction into the armed forces at a time of a controversial war - Draft Morning, to the nostalgia about our youth - Goin Back. Words just don't do justice to the music.

user avatar

uh huh

caro1eb

(What ever happened to sitars???) Very creative album; soft & dreamy vocals, even on "Draft Morning." Instrumentals nearly too-acute-to-bear. It does put me into a very pleasant mood, so to speak. And I'm not even toking. Except for track 17, which isn't really a track and is a complete waste of time after you've heard it once, the bonus tracks seem to fit right in; I favor the second "Draft Morning," and the "reprise" of Goin' Back stands on its own. Worthy album download.

user avatar

Byrds FLY HIGHER

RickyRicardo

Space Odyssey is a classic. It is the kind of rock ballad that is best listened to while high. Roger McGuinn is the gold standard for rock ballads.

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Birds sore

007NicKname

What? This is a really terrific album that really flows and makes the walls drip with yellow matter custard. Very psychedelic, stony and spacy. This is what the Beachwood Sparks tried to immulate (and did a pretty good job.) I'm thrilled to have it for my iPod now.

user avatar

For years I overlooked this

Psychsound

I always loved the Byrds, but for years I overlooked this album. Maybe I thought it was their country album. It isn't. It is classic Byrds, maybe their best. Other than Mood Raga, everything here is outstanding. Very 1960's, but that's what we want, right?

user avatar

An all-time great

ProgNClassicaLover

Oh, is this album gorgeous !!! Almost any one of these little gems could have been blown up into a 10 minute epic, but they weren't, so you'll just have to keep playing them over and over to get the same effect. The Byrds were at that precarious precipice before they stumbled over onto the slippery slope descending into "country rock". For some warped reason, their next album, "Sweetheart of the Rodeo" is the critics' darling but any true Byrds fan (which should be everyone) loves this album.

user avatar

Byrds Soar!

mkmckinney

The Notorious Byrd Bros. is a classic album. Recorded while the group was going through personnel changes with Crosby no longer in the group it still sounds fresh today.

user avatar

Ages fantastically well...

LukeHennig

It may be heard as slopped together... most of the songs are short, a couple of convenient covers, etc... but goodness the cohesion! And of course we know Crosby was being kicked out at the time (we've all heard the 'Triad' story a hundred times... I prefer the one about his megalomania at Monterrey Pop)... but listen closely: 'ol Croz is in there where it counts. And "Change Is Now" is an highwater mark any day of the week...

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They Say All Music Guide

The recording sessions for the Byrds’ fifth album, The Notorious Byrd Brothers, were conducted in the midst of internal turmoil that found them reduced to a duo by the time the record was completed. That wasn’t evident from listening to the results, which showed the group continuing to expand the parameters of their eclecticism while retaining their hallmark guitar jangle and harmonies. With assistance from producer Gary Usher, they took more chances in the studio, enhancing the spacy quality of tracks like “Natural Harmony” and Goffin & King’s “Wasn’t Born to Follow” with electronic phasing. Washes of Moog synthesizer formed the eerie backdrop for “Space Odyssey,” and the songs were craftily and unobtrusively linked with segues and fades. But the Byrds did not bury the essential strengths of their tunes in effects: “Goin’ Back” (also written by Goffin & King) was a magnificent and melodic cover with the expected tasteful 12-string guitar runs that should have been a big hit. “Tribal Gathering” has some of the band’s most effervescent harmonies; “Draft Morning” is a subtle and effective reflection of the horrors of the Vietnam War; and “Old John Robertson” looks forward to the country-rock that would soon dominate their repertoire. [The CD reissue adds six bonus tracks, including different versions of "Goin' Back" and "Draft Morning," a few instrumentals, and David Crosby's controversial "Triad"; unlisted on the sleeve is a rehearsal outtake which captures comically vitriolic arguments among the band.] – Richie Unterberger

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