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Promenade

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (43 ratings)

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Promenade album cover
01
Bath
4:10  
02
Going Downhill Fast
2:33  
03
The Booklovers
5:52  
04
A Seafood Song
3:29  
05
Geronimo
1:53  
06
Don't Look Down
4:48  
07
When the Lights Go Out All Over Europe
3:29  
08
The Summerhouse
4:15  
09
Neptune's Daughter
4:49  
10
A Drinking Song
4:37  
11
Ten Seconds to Midnight
2:10  
12
Tonight We Fly
3:01  
13
Untitled Outro
0:15  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 13   Total Length: 45:21

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Promenade is vintage DC

gojira70

While not quite as good as 'Casanova', 'Promenade' is very good, and very much in the 'Casanova' style of baroque, witty, guitar-less Brit-pop. I prefer the second half of the album, as you can hear the bridge between this album and the next. 'The Summerhouse' is a classic, a wistful days gone past beauty.

user avatar

This one is my favorite

Timble

An all around spectacular and memorable album. In my top 25. The Summerhouse is the only song on here that I'm not wild about, the rest I've listened to regularly for years.

user avatar

The Best Album of All Time

Popgun

If you're lucky, once in your life you'll come across an album that is absolutely flawless. Chances are it'll be this album. A bona fide pop masterpiece and proof positive that Neil Hannon is the greatest songwriter of his generation. If you had 12 desert island downloads, use them on this.

user avatar

The Best Album of All Time

Popgun

If you're lucky, once in your life you'll come across an album that is absolutely flawless. Chances are it'll be this album. A bona fide pop masterpiece and proof positive that Neil Hannon is the greatest songwriter of his generation. If you had 12 desert island downloads, use them on this.

user avatar

Simply amazing - even 12 years on

PhoneyBasler

If you only download 1 Divine Comedy make it this one. Lose yourself in the magical little world that Neil creates herein. There's so much going on it's not true: if you want great ballads try The Summerhouse; grandstanding emotion try Tonight We Fly; humor - well all of it, but especially A Drinking Song; a song filled with literary pretension but that also debunks it - The Booklovers; a theological treatise on the existing of God set atop a ferris wheel - Don't look down... I could go on. So much here to love. Best album on eMusic, and that is saying something.

They Say All Music Guide

While in appearance, it seems like a sequel to Liberation — a similar cover shot down to the typeface that is on the front, in this case showing Hannon in front of the IM Pei-designed entrance to the Louvre, while the back shows a similarly Rococo piece of decoration — Promenade is in fact even more extremely and defiantly non-rock than its predecessor. With a larger number of string performers to accompany him, not to mention someone on oboe, sax, and cor anglais (English horn), Hannon retains only drummer/co-producer Darren Allison from the previous record to make what remains his most self-conscious art release to date. The opening “Bath” sets the course, with seacoast sounds and a brief spoken word bit that turns into a minimalist Michael Nyman homage before slamming into the song proper, where the guitars and bass take a back seat to the choir, strings, and woodwinds, all the while driven along by Allison’s solid percussion. From there all kinds of twists and turns emerge in an alternate universe where classical instrumentation offers as much pop as a guitar strum. The extreme archness of “Going Downhill Fast” is also a pub singalong, while “Don’t Look Down” builds to a dramatic, striking ending. Hannon’s wickedly sharp wit informs almost everything; “The Booklovers” is the clear winner on that count, as Hannon tremulously recites a number of authors’ names (with an appropriate accompanying sample or aside, often quite hilarious) over a stately arrangement. “A Seafood Song” and “A Drinking Song” celebrate exactly what they say they do, the latter offering up the great line “All my lovers will be pink and elephantine!” At the same time, the tender side of Hannon, which has sometimes been ignored, surfaces more than once, with “The Summerhouse,” a nostalgic, wonderfully gentle piece on a lost season of love. This turns out to be one of Hannon’s best songs ever. – Ned Raggett

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