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Freedom Wind

Rate It! Avg: 4.0 (35 ratings)
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Freedom Wind album cover
01
Forever
2:32
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02
Honey, I Don't Know Why
2:59
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03
Don't Forget The Sun
3:11
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04
Lost My Head
2:07
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05
Do You Love Me?
2:46
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06
Summer Air
2:23
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07
If You Go
3:22
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08
In The Country
3:45
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09
Safe Distance
2:06
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10
Hold Me Tight
3:17
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11
Last Kiss
2:35
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12
Freedom Wind
3:57
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 12   Total Length: 35:00

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Refreshing!

StratDad

These boys have the right idea. Okay, its like they majored in "Brian Wilson" in college, but that's just at first listen. Their style rings all those old bells, but they have their own things to say. Its non-cynical, positive, and that's all good. Hope they do more.

user avatar

Beach Boys pop done with a current flair

slackagogo

I have a problem with reviews that compare albums to the Beach Boys, since most of the time the comparison is trivial or doesn't hold up at all. But in this instance, it's pretty damn obvious that late 60's Beach Boys is main reference point for this South Carolina band. The harmonies, the production, the instrumentation, the song style all point to Pet Sounds (in particular, but they touch on parts of the Beach Boys albums through Holland). On one hand, they could be a tribute band, but they manage to come up a collection of very strong songs and take the references into a very fresh sounding album. If you wished the Beach Boys made one more solid album in 1968 this could fill that void for you.

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Uncanny!

powerofpop

I love this - brilliant pastiches of a magical musical time. Kudos!

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A modernization of classic mid 60's harmony pop.

JanglePop

These South Carolina dudes have made an outstanding Brian Wilson influenced album. This new band has taken all the great things I loved about the Beach Boys and 60's pop, and given this classic sound a modern indie pop touch. Not just from the Beach Boys, but traces of ELO, Paul McCartney (Wings era), The Apples in Stereo, The Ronettes, Buffalo Springfield, and the Association and Turtles pop up. Great songwriting, tight harmonies (sadly lacking in most modern rock) with smart production and arrangement skills. They honestly add nothing new, but they have youth on their side (they are all in their early-mid 20's) and they amazingly make it all sound fresh and cool again. It's far from your usual "oldies" tribute band stuff. If you love the boys and classic 60's soft pop you'll be right at home with the Explorers Club.

They Say All Music Guide

To say that the Explorers Club are trying to channel the mid-’60s Beach Boys on Freedom Wind isn’t meant as complaint or praise or any other subjective judgment. It’s objective. They are trying to channel the Beach Boys, utterly, totally, completely, and they’re not pretending otherwise. From the reverb and the ever popular Ronettes drum break starting “Forever” and the album off to the close harmonies and the lyrical subject matter and more, even the studio chatter, this is a Beach Boys clone, tribute, borrowing, imitation, call it what you will. And the band isn’t hiding it at all or pretending otherwise — to the point where the CD booklet is produced to seem like a scuffed and well-loved vinyl sleeve starting to rub off a bit around the record’s circumference. So all this said, what to say about it? Perversely enough, the fact that they are so direct about it almost makes the whole thing more worthwhile than the endless number of bands that have worn their Brian Wilson fetish on their sleeves but can’t get anywhere near what makes that band so great. By wishing they were the band themselves — or wishing they were the Wondermints backing up Brian Wilson, at least — the Explorers Club have produced a nearly unchallengeable album. If you love the Beach Boys’ work in its “starting to be dreamily insular” phase, you’ll enjoy every last note on here as the familiar combinations they are, different but the same, even while shaking your head with a chuckle at the sheer nuttiness of it all. If you don’t like the Beach Boys, you won’t like this. There it is; there’s all that can be said. – Ned Raggett

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