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Perverted By Language

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Perverted By Language album cover
Disc 1 of 2
01
Eat Y'Self Fitter
6:35  
02
Neighbourhood of Infinity
2:40  
03
Garden
8:42  
04
Hotel Bloedel
3:46  
05
Smile
5:08  
06
I Feel Voxish
4:19  
07
Tempo House
8:52  
08
Hexen Definitive / Strife Knot
6:56  
09
The Man Whose Head Expanded
4:20  
10
Ludd Gang
2:32  
11
Kicker Conspiracy
4:18  
12
Wings
4:26  
13
Pilsner Trail
4:50  
Disc 2 of 2
01
Smile (Peel Session #5)
5:11  
02
Garden (Peel Session #5)
10:01  
03
Hexen Definitive / Strife Knot (Peel Session #5)
9:08  
04
Eat Y'Self Fitter (Peel Session #5)
7:01  
05
Garden (Remix)
8:42  
06
Neighbourhood of Infinity (Live)
3:08  
07
Smile (Live)
5:39  
08
Tempo House (Live)
7:17  
09
Perverted By Language (Live)
1:35  
10
Wings (Live)
3:36  
11
Backdrop (Live)
11:12  
Album Information

Total Tracks: 24   Total Length: 139:54

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