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Snowball

Rate It! Avg: 4.5 (31 ratings)
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Snowball album cover
01
Let's Kiss And Make Up
6:14
$0.49
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02
You're Kidding Aren't You
2:34
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03
End Of The Affair
4:14
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04
Couldn't Feel Safer
3:46
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05
This Love Is Not Wrong
3:22
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06
Everything About You
2:30
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07
White
4:50
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08
Letting Go
6:33
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Album Information

Total Tracks: 8   Total Length: 34:03

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Download this classic now

Debaser

Why wait? It's incredible and woefully overlooked.

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One of my favorite Sarah releases

pershkey

Yeah, this is available elsewhere with bonus tracks, but it's cool to have just the original EP intact with the original artwork. I remember the album cover being purple, though. If The Field Mice are new to you, check out "Letting Go" for a taste of their melodic, melancholy side and "White" to hear the mice roar.

They Say All Music Guide

The Field Mice’s first album (and one of the first non-7″ releases on the nascent Sarah Records label), 1989′s Snowball leads off with “Let’s Kiss and Make Up,” probably the duo’s best-known song thanks to Saint Etienne’s cover on 1991′s Foxbase Alpha. It’s fitting that Saint Etienne scored the hit with their sparkling, danceable version, as it’s simply a better use of the song. The Field Mice’s own version is over-extended at over six minutes (the first two and a half of them devoted to an extended instrumental intro) and Robert Wratten sings it as if he’s barely awake. The album picks up considerably from that somnambulant opener, going into a stretch of songs more akin to the minor-key jangle of their earlier EPs, with the mournful “Couldn’t Feel Safer” a particular highlight. Toward the end of the album, Wratten and co-mouse Michael Hiscock venture into more experimental territory with a pair of songs that prefigure the more electronic vibe of their next album, 1990′s Skywriting. “White” is a five-minute exploration into My Bloody Valentine’s circa-Isn’t Anything phased-guitars-and-clatter style, with Wratten singing like a slightly less-zombified Bilinda Butcher, while the heavily sequenced “Letting Go” sounds like an attempt to jump the Madchester bandwagon. – Stewart Mason

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